Tag Archives: science

20-1223 Voyager Station

Welcome to Space! 

Sawyer Thorpe  6/3/2021

By 2027 a space hotel will be opened for citizens from around the world. For a 3 and a half night stay at this hotel in orbit of our home, it will run you at $5 million USD. With accommodations for every customer, there will be portable habitats of land from around the world. With their most recent $1,000,000 USD donation goal reached, they announced that they would be able to construct the hotel that will be 200 meters in diameter with pools, trees, and portable habitats in it. 

space

“Our planned orbit and elevation for Voyager Station is 97 deg and 500-500 km. This is a sun-synchronous polar orbit that will reduce thermal stress and allow the most continuous solar power generation. There, orbit degradation and space debris risk will be nominal.” Announced OAC’s official twitter account.

Orbital Assembly Corporation’s Twitter account continuously gives updates about their progress on the orbital hotel that spread from comedic posts to construction and even features for their part-time show that runs on Youtube and other platforms.

With the possibility of space debris shutting down the entire project, the space station has plotted a course to bring minimum danger to its passengers while bringing the best experience possible for a hefty price of $5 million USD a stay. 

With help coming in from the United States’ NASA program to a private company called SpaceX, prices for space travel have considerably lowered in terms of the broad look of things. 

With comments about the articles coming to light, many are beginning to suspect that all of this planning and construction is simply talk while they find a way to take the money for themselves. With it being in the realm of possibilities, investors must use their own sense of judgement in the project. 

VT Snow Storms Have Connection with Global Warming

Mr. Grayson Moore

HINESBURG, VT– With all the recent winter storms and snow days that the Chittenden County area has recently experienced, some seem to be skeptical of the idea that the Earth is actually warming.

According to the National Weather Service, the Burlington area just experienced its greatest snowfall in the month of January since 2010 (41.3 inches) and only the second instance of 40+ inches of snow in January in the past 40 years.

Color-coded map showing how average air temperatures changed across the United States from 1901 to 2015.
Image from EPA.gov

However, the notion that snowstorms disprove the concept that the world is getting warmer is misguided and simply false, based on the statistics on climate and weather changes.

According to the 2017 Climate Science Special Report, “global annually averaged surface air temperature has increased by about 1.8°F (1.0°C) over the last 115 years.” This report also states that the planet is in the warmest period “in the history of modern civilization.” The report notes that the global average sea level has risen by 7-8 inches since 1900, with almost half of that growth coming since 1993.

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Rosalind Franklin & Nicole Gorman, Unsung Heroes in Science

Ms. Sarah Clauss, CVC Science & Environmental Correspondent

When most people think of famous scientists, they think of Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, or Isaac Newton. While these are three important contributors to our body of scientific knowledge, it’s not a particularly diverse group. While the field of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) was once dominated by white men, we owe our current understanding to men and women from all nationalities, ethnicities, and origins.

Nicole Gorman teaches AP Biology at Champlain Valley Union HS. Despite the quick pace of lessons and massive amount of content that she covers, Ms. Gorman always takes time during the unit on genetics to discuss Rosalind Franklin, the woman whose chromographs of genetic material — shared by a colleague, without Franklin’s knowledge or permission — led to Watson and Crick’s double helix model of DNA.

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Rosalind Franklin, The Mother of DNA

 

Although Franklin’s work allowed Cambridge University geneticists James Watson and Francis Crick to accurately model DNA, she did not receive a Nobel Prize. Franklin died at age 37, likely a result of exposure to X-ray radiation in the line of her research.

Ms. Gorman teaches this lesson for several reasons. First, she says, “I like to talk about the scientists that contributed to our understanding/helped to explain a variety of foundational concepts… One compelling reason to point this out is to encourage students themselves to ask, discover and explain.” She also thinks that it is an important lesson in collaboration; too many young scientists think that working together is not necessary. Lastly, Gorman takes this opportunity to talk about taking credit for the work of others. “The story of Rosalind Franklin is an interesting story about how this can and does happen,” she says.

Ms. Gorman also discussed why she thinks that it’s important for students to have a diverse set of academic role models. According to her, “role models are a source of inspiration. Inspiration from many different sources ensures that you can continue to be inspired as you grow and change over time.”

In addition, she claims that having a role model that a student can identify with allows them to imagine themselves making the same choices and moving in similar directions to that person. She says, “If your role model is someone you want to be, then this desire will drive the choices you make….even if they are difficult choices. The power of thinking you are similar to someone or want to be like someone is an excellent driver of engagement, [which] drives progress.”

Rosalind Franklin is just one of many inspiring scientists in her field. But in CVU’s AP Biology classroom, her story is inspiring the scientists of a new generation.

 

A Force in Motion: The CVU Science Curriculum Will Evolve Next Year

Mssrs. Isaac Cleveland and Earl Fletcher

HINESBURG, VT – The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), after being adopted by the Vermont Department of Education in June of 2013, are completely changing CVU’s science curriculum to allow their students to have more well-rounded skills in science.  The NGSS is completely altering how students learn and use their science skills.

According to Katherine Riley, Director of Curriculum and Instruction, students will be getting “two solid years of science curriculum where they will be practicing their skills for the upper level science classes.” NGSS educates students through skill-based learning targets, allowing them to be knowledgeable in the general science topics needed for life.

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Physics in action. Image by Isaac Cleveland

CVU started altering their curriculum in the Fall of the 2015/16 for the incoming freshman class. Integrated Environmental Science has replaced Freshman Core science and Integrated Biology has been introduced as a required class for this year’s Sophomores. One of the reasons for making the new Integrated Biology a required course was that, according to Katherine Riley, “Teachers couldn’t have the students long enough to really get an in-depth look at human bio.” With the new system for Freshman and Sophomores, students “can go into more depth” and they “get better general skills.”

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Tangible Product Fair Showcases Senior Works

Ms. Katherine Hoechner

Graduation Challenge is an opportunity for students to explore into a topic that they personally find interesting. There is an option of the project that allows students to create a Tangible Product that can both be graded by the Panel and showcased for fun. This year, CVU hosted its annual Tangible Product fair on May 21, 2015. Over 40 students showcased their projects ranging from a photography display to a reconstructed car.

Although the CVC didn’t have the chance to document every single project, here is photo gallery of those we did get to check out, and the stories that accompany the products.

Franklin (skis)

 

Natalie Franklin- For her Grad Challenge, Natalie spent 60+ hours designing and creating her own pair of skis.

Jake Dawson- For his Grad Challenge, Jake built a Tiny House with a team of 15 others. A family of three and their pet dog plan on moving in once construction is finished.

Emma VincenVincent (skirts)t- For her Grad Challenge, Emma had lots of fun designing and making ballet skirts. These skirts can be found and purchased off of her website: ableskirts.bigcartel.com. You can also check her out on Instagram and Facebook @ableskirts

Nicole Boufard- For her Grad Challenge Nicole worked with photography and created a small-scale exhibit for people to view. At the Fair she also showcased her new website that her photographs can be found on as well. Nicole spent over 300 hours on the project itself, and 150 on the Tangible Product alone.

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CVU’s Energy Efficiency Challenge

Mr. Max Brown 

Try to imagine what 119 metric tons of CO2 emissions really looks like. Or how much greenhouse gas is released from 24 passenger vehicles in a year. Or the average CO2 emissions from electricity use in 17.9 US homes in a year.

The truth is, this is an extremely substantial amount of air pollution. What if all of this could be saved just by reducing electrical usage in one school building?

It can. Champlain Valley Union High School of Vermont was able to save the equivalent of 119 metric tons of CO2 emissions. It was part of Efficiency Vermont’s Whole School Energy Challenge. This challenge is designed to “engage school stakeholders (e.g. students, teachers, facility management, principal, administration, community members) in a campaign of best practices ranging from policy to operations & maintenance to behavior in order to reduce the School’s use of energy and associated costs.”

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