Tag Archives: CVU

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Cross country costume race

By Mina Radivojevic

FAIRFAX, VT- From Tree (Oliver King), to Lumberjack (Owen Deale), to Trash (Charli Geravelli)…

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…to Tinkerbells (Josie Sayre and Eliza Amsbery)…

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…to Mom (Nico Cuneo) and Pregnant Santa (Mario Robinson)…

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…to Princess (Evie Schumann) and Winnie the Phoo (Lindley Pickard)…

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…to The Lorax duo (Thomas Geravelli and Logan Pickard)…

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…to the whole Despicable me crew (Ava Rohrbaugh, Mia Marino and Jameson)…

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…and of course, Bananas (Eliza McLean and Matt Lollis)…

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All of them raced on October 5th in the Fairfax Costume race, which was more than dazzling. CVU, as always, was very successful. Besides original costumes that won awards for their creativity…

…like The Death Combo (Segoleine Johnson and Annalise Wood)

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And The Magic Eight Balls (Phoebe Denniso, Maddie Haydock, Mina Radivojevic, Olivia StPeter, Chloe Stidsen and Anna Van Buren),

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CVU also took the top three awards for speed. Third place went for Business Men (Ben Mcauliffe and Greg Seraus, respectively).

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Second place went to Accountants (Jack Crum and Kody Guiterman).

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And the first place went to the Minions duo (Brandon Milatello and Jameson McEnaney).

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What’s up with winter sports?

By Asa Roberts

As fall sports come to a close, it’s time to start looking at the upcoming winter season. This year has a plethora of opportunities to get active! From hitting the slopes with the alpine ski team to trying out the all new girls wrestling team, there’s something for everyone! 

Cross Country skiing: 

Are you looking for a great way to get outside and stay in shape this winter? Take a look at cross country skiing! No experience necessary, skiers of all levels and competitiveness are welcome to join. Nordic skiing practices every day after school at the local ski center Sleepy Hollow (once there’s snow). Sleepy Hollow is a Great place for skiers of all abilities, and passes work all year round for skiing, snowshoeing, hiking and biking. If you enjoy being outside and staying fit, you are in luck. Coach Sara Strack will be heading the CVU team this year once again, and will surely make this season amazing. Cross country skiing had its first meeting last Thursday the 28th. Missed it? No worries! You can learn more about nordic by visiting CVU nordics website here, or by emailing coach Strack.

Alpine skiing:

More into going down the hills? Check out the Alpine ski team. The ski team starts their season before the snow falls with workouts and practices in the mini gym. Ski team is open for new racers, as well as veterans, so no matter what your level of experience, you are sure to fit in. Alpine racing practices at Cochrans during the week, and heads up to Sugarbush on Saturdays for training on the big hill. If you are interested in picking up racing, or have any questions regarding the season, be sure to reach out to assistant coach Lee Morse laxcoach.vt@myfairpoint.net. Alpine  skiing starts soon so be sure to check it out!

Indoor track:

If you are interested in staying fit, or preparing for track and field this spring, check out indoor track club. Indoor track is a great option if you are looking for a low commitment sport, or if you are wanting to practice every day. Indoor track practices at parisi on mondays and tuesdays, with plenty of opportunities for carpooling, so don’t let rides deter you. Meets are on Saturdays at the indoor track at UVM, and are optional. Looking for a way to practice field events?Indoor tracks got that too! Both track and most field events are available. If you are interested, or want to learn more, email coach Elise Seraus at cvuindoortrack@gmail.com.

Basketball:

Both boys and girls basketball are back in full swing this year! With the girls season being tragically cut short right before the championship game two years ago, and no fans being allowed at games last year, both teams are more excited than ever to lace up and play. Boys Basketball will once again be having a varsity, JVA, and JVB team this year, and the all star coaching staff will be returning. Coach Osborne, who brought last year’s team to the quarterfinals is returning this year to make another run. CVU’s very own Seth Emerson will be coaching JVA, and Pat Keogh will be the JVB coach. If you are interested in trying out for the basketball team, email Coach Osborne or talk to CVU’s Seth Emerson.  

Girls Basketball is excited to be back on the court! The girls will be having three teams as well this year, and will be head coached by Ute Otley once Again. The girls will surely be dominant once again this year, so even if you aren’t a player, be sure to go watch and support. The girls host open gyms during preseason. To learn more, email coach Otley.

Wrestling:

CVU is excited to offer wrestling opportunities for both boys and girls this year! Wrestling is an awesome opportunity to get fit and build self confidence for everyone. Gunnar Olson will be coaching the wrestling team this year, and the team is open to wrestlers of all experiences and abilities, contact coach Olson at olsonsitedesign@myfairpoint.net. Ladies, if you are interested, contact CVU student Cassidy Flemming  at 469-773-1889 for more information or any questions. Be sure to check out CVU wrestling’s website here.

Gymnastics:

With floor, beam and bar events, CVU gymnastics has something for everyone. Following an amazing 2020 season where they took home gold, gymnastics had a modified season during 2021, and are looking forward to getting back to normal for the 2021 season. Coach Madison Bordeau is back again to lead the team. Practices are held at Green Mountain Training Center in Williston, and are every day. If you are looking into gymnastics this year, contact Dan Shepardson.

Hockey:

CVU’s hockey teams are starting up soon, so lace up your skates and get out on the ice. The girls once again are teaming up with MMU to form the Cougarhawks. The girls head coach Scott Bushweller will be returning along with his stellar coaching squad, and are officially taking over the program from MMU, but will keep the name Cougarhawks. Boys hockey is looking forward to a great season this year, with head coach J.P. Benoit returning. Both girls and boys hockey hold open ice sessions throughout the year, and the season is starting up soon. Contact Dan Sheperdson for more information.

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CVU’s New Stomach Ache: School Lunchtime

By Harrison Young-Glatz

At Champlain Valley Union High School, lunchtime is becoming a hot topic due to the number of unmasked kids in close proximity to one another. Many kids end up sitting outside to cram fewer into the cafeteria, but with COVID cases still high in Vermont, some students are starting to worry that during the colder months, when kids stop eating outside, that the cafeteria will become a field day for the COVID-19 virus. Alex, an 11th grader at CVU, mentioned, “Man, It was crazy (on the first day of school); half the kids were outside.” He continued, “Like what’s gonna happen when it’s too cold to sit out there? Admin’s gonna have to do something about it.”

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The head director of the cafeteria, Leo LaForce, stated, “The school runs off of CDC guidelines. If the CDC ever deems masking or distancing no longer necessary, then lunchtime will be a lot more manageable.” 

Dr. Alex Huffman, an aerosol and bioaerosol specialist at the University of Denver, said on twitter, “Indoor lunches are high risk b/c: COVID is largely airborne, Masks are off, Kids are often packed closely, Many kids in one room, Kids are louder at lunch (so more aerosol is released).”

In response to this, LaForce had to say, “Yeah, I’m concerned about the kids who go home every day to immuno-compromised or younger/older family members. I know that most of the kids in our cafeteria are vaccinated, and symptoms aren’t likely as bad for vaccinated people, but then that kid could go home bringing the virus to their family members who aren’t as fortunate.” 

 If indoor lunches are deemed too risky by the CDC, CVU may have to revert back to 2020-21’s school year lunchtime model. A dozen or less kids in different rooms throughout the building, and the cafeteria would deliver bagged lunches to kids in those rooms. When questioned about this, LaForce replied, “I really hope it doesn’t go back to delivered lunch. I just want kids to have a normal lunch again.”

Administration could not be reached for comment by the time of publication.

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Working under COVID: two views

By Mina Radivojevic

HINESBURG, VT – As an exchange student from Serbia, I haven’t been here for a long time, but one of the first things that I learned about Vermont is that a lot of places can’t keep up with demand since they don’t have enough people to keep businesses going.

The people who are holding many businesses together are actually busy, full- scheduled high school students. So, the best way to look at this situation is through two different lenses: grown up employer vs. high school employee. 

Will Patten, the owner of the Public House restaurant in Hinesburg, shared with me his view and experience with lack of workers and hiring students. CVU students, in this case. “So, we don’t have any trouble hiring people from CVU; that is pretty much all we can hire. Which is not great because most people don’t have any experience and they play sports. But that’s pretty much all we can hire now. For people in high school, a job is a form of independence, a way out of the house. It’s gas money, it’s a third place. It’s home, school and now a job. So that’s not where the problem is, the problem is with people who are on their own, supporting themselves, paying the rent, have mortgages and car payment. Those are the people that aren’t coming to work. And it’s not just restaurants, it’s everybody. Every business in Hinesburg wants to hire somebody. It’s crazy. “ 

Patten also made a note that his cafe needs to be closed for two days of the week due to lack of workers.

Lila Shober, one of the working CVU students, had a similar experience at her workplace because of the same problem. “I work at the Windjammer Tuesdays and Fridays and Saturdays. I work in an environment that’s really busy because of the lack of workers. Sometimes parts of our restaurant are closed because of the lack of staff,” she said.

At the same time, Shober had found the silver lining of what’s going on: “But some perks about it is that I do get more income. It’s very stressful being there three times a week. After school. After practice. It can be really tiring and I do go to school tired sometimes, but I do like having extra money. And I am really worried about, at least, my restaurant staying above float so I always try and help out as much as I can.”

One more perk that Shober pointed out is the fact that there are more options to choose from, since there’s no one else to work.

To answer my question why they think this is happening and what role COVID plays, Patten and Shober didn’t hesitate much. 

Patten claims that, during COVID, people were taught not to work. He also considered all that we’ve been going through lately, putting climate change right next to the pandemic as one of the factors why people lost their belief in progress.

Shober’s interpretation of the situation is that people’s mental health was what got most damaged by coronavirus, and that it had also put a lot of fear into people, making them even scared to go out.

Not only did COVID affect people’s work ethic in this and the previous year, but we have yet to see what’s to come and how it will affect the future for businesses and lives in Vermont.

Original photo by Ethan Cook

Should Vermonters be required to wear masks?

By Ethan Cook

After the brief low of Covid cases over the summer, many people still haven’t gotten their masks back on. Covid cases in Vermont have actually increased since the so-called ‘peak’ of the pandemic, yet many people still aren’t covering their faces while inside.

This is because the vaccine has been thought of as preventative, when it really serves mostly as a reduction of symptoms. According to an article on NBC5 from October 12th, “just over 3,600 fully vaccinated Vermonters have contracted the virus after being fully vaccinated, also known as a ‘breakthrough’ case of COVID-19 as of Oct. 12. That represents roughly 0.8% of fully vaccinated residents.” This data tells us that vaccinations greatly reduce the severity of the virus, but do less of a good job at preventing it altogether. That is a job for masks and other precautions. 

The same article also helps by explaining when to wear masks. “The CDC’s updated mask guidance says fully vaccinated Americans do not need to wear masks or physically distance indoors or outdoors, with some exceptions. People should wear masks in crowded indoor locations like airplanes, buses, hospitals and prisons.” Vermont laws include schools as well.

However, masking is still being pushed back against by some individuals. Masks have been a crucial part of most Americans’ lives for the past year. Laws have been constantly changing in regard to whether or not masks are a necessity, and Vermont is no exception. The Vermont government has put in place regulations requiring masks in schools, and all members of the executive branch, which includes politicians, police officers, and other government workers, were to get vaccinated.

 At the end of August 2021, Twinfield Union school had already closed classrooms due to cases of Covid, and prisons in Vermont have started requiring masks again after over 20 people were diagnosed. Northern Vermont University decided it was best to switch back to online schooling when eight students got Covid in a week. Sylvia Plumb, director of marketing and communications, stated that, “with cases rising in Vermont and throughout the United States, this is not unexpected. This underscores how critically important it is for our community to be vaccinated, masked up properly while inside, and testing as appropriate.” 

Governor Scott thinks that the problem is that people are not getting vaccinated. “Vaccines are still changing the game. We need people to keep stepping up to get their shot and to get the booster when the time comes.” Covid-19 statistics showed an upcoming decrease in early September, but through those weeks, there had been increases of over 20 percent.  On September 23rd, we had a day in which 289 new cases were diagnosed in Vermont. The situation has gotten much worse since June, but taking as many precautions as possible will help to bring us back to normal.

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First Semester of School, Last Year of Covid ?

By Ian Dunkley

HINESBURG, VT  – A student walks off a big yellow bus and onto the Champlain Valley Union High School (CVU) campus for the first time.  Like many before them, they have butterflies in their stomach, but can’t wait to start their new life in high school. The first day of school was August 26th, with students and teachers alike getting right back into the swing of things. To see how the community was feeling about the return, I spoke with several people about events that they would like to see return in the 2021-22 school year.

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Original photo by Ian Dunkley

Donovan, a senior in Nichols core, told me, “Rally or the winter carnival.” Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, some students haven’t had the opportunity to attend large group events like these, and experience how fun they can be.

Jasmine is also a senior from Nichols. “I’m more like the person that wanted to see [...] the after school things like prom,” she said.

The next thought that Donovan and Jasmine shared was related to this year’s academic system compared to last year. Donovan described the courses as “a little harder” and attributed the increase in difficulty to the five in-person days per week we now have. Jasmine thought the opposite. ”I think they are easier because like, at least we’re not doing online learning, which was hard at least. [...] It’s easier because we got to see each other.” 

One new change implemented this year is a  program called Community, Clubs, Connect, better known as C3. To better understand the purpose of C3, I asked co-creator Zach Smith why he developed the program, “In part with Emily [Rinkema] here, a bunch of other faculty and staff, it was actually something that over the last few years was developed by a bunch of committees made up of a lot of different teachers and leaders at CVU. So it was about a two-year process to design it. And this is just our first year implementing it. [...] Our purpose, one, has been students have been remote or in some form of remote learning for the past two years, and a lot of students are missing out on those social connections and C3 is a great way to bring our focus in now not just like our staff, but our community. We really want to encourage those connections as much as possible this year, [...] our number one thing here is to engage students. And with clubs, in the past clubs have only met after or before school, so it was inequitable. So a big part of having C3 in the middle of the day, is all students can attend it, it’s time to either connect with the teacher find a new community or club that interests them, whereas in the past, it was only equitable to students who had a form of transportation or who didn’t have a job after school or siblings to take care of.” 

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Original photo by Ian Dunkley

 The final person I spoke with was Jamie Hayes, CVU’s very own campus supervisor. I asked Jamie how she usually connects with the new, and returning students, especially after last year. She told me, “Honestly, it’s really hard, it’s a very difficult thing to do. We try to talk or I personally try to talk to people in the hallways, whether it’s like, hey how you doing today, or sometimes I’m like yo your shirt is awesome [...]  It’s really hard getting to know ninth-graders and transfer students just because we don’t see them as often. I just try to talk to people every day and get people comfortable with seeing me and talking with me, and hopefully, eventually form a connection where they might come up and say hi.”

Finally, I asked Jamie how this year compares to last year. “I think it just feels more chaotic. [...] Yeah, it was too quiet last year. It’s just really really nice to see everyone together again and you see everyone you know, happy to see each other too.” 

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What does it mean to be a CVU Journalist?

By: Phoebe Henderson

HINESBURG, VT– As a Junior at Champlain Valley Union High School, I wasn’t sure what to expect when joining the group of journalists for my last quarter of the year. I had little to no knowledge about what it meant to be a journalist. After completing my Creative Writing class second quarter, I learned that I have a passion for writing stories and poems. This influenced my decision to join the Journalism class taught by Amanda Terwillegar. 

My experience this year gave me the chance to dig deeper into the world of local news. I have never been one to read the newspaper or watch the news, but becoming a journalist has opened up new opportunities and experiences for me. Personally, I wouldn’t have normally chosen a writing class that involves interviewing people outside of the classroom, but doing so has taught me to speak up and become more involved with our local community.

An average day in Journalism consisted of first reading the news and sharing out amongst the class some of the top headlines from breaking news websites such as BBC, CNN, VTdigger, etc. Then we moved into editing our individual stories.

There are many different forms of journalism that we worked with, such as investigative journalism, where journalists dive deep into a certain topic, researching and interviewing different ideas (these pieces tend to be longer). A roll-in piece is a film that includes main footage of a specific topic, along with a voice over explaining what’s happening in the short video which we then sent over to the CVU Show. “Hard news” refers to breaking news and is normally a much shorter and very relevant piece. Lastly, feature articles tell you what you want to know; they take you behind the scenes and explain everything in much more depth and greater length. I worked mostly with feature and hard news pieces.   

As you know, Covid has played a major role in our education system this year. School schedules were shifted and classes were cut in half. Meaning that I was only able to experience Journalism in half a semester. Although we were cut short with time,  we made the best of it and ended up receiving a lot of consistent news regarding the pandemic that then got turned into pieces.

All of our pieces go through editing and revising once completed. Then they either get posted on the CVU Chronicle, which can be found on the CVU website, or are passed onto the CVU show!

If you are interested in writing or even just need another English credit, I highly recommend joining Journalism. It gives you a new perspective on writing and can open up new opportunities of learning filled with great experiences!

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What CVU has Learned About Covid-19

Kobey Pecor

HINESBURG, VT–I was reading a Vox news article about how the Pandemic has affected the United States and this one line struck me: “America has an opportunity to learn from its mistakes during the Covid-19 pandemic.” So, I was interested and I wanted to connect this back to my community and my school and get their point of view on how Covid has affected CVU.

I spoke with two teachers, Tim Wile (Lead Counselor) and Rahn Fleming (Director of Learning Center)  about the strengths and weaknesses of COVID-19 on CVU. 

Both Fleming and Wile both gave me similar responses to questions. They both very much value relationships  in their lives, especially what they do as their jobs.  Communication and Relationships seemed to be the heart of the conversation.

I asked, “What would you do differently to prepare for the next pandemic?”

“The first word that comes to mind is communication, Having new ideas brought up on the fly. Generating, Decimating, and following up on new   information,” said Fleming.

I asked what CVU has learned about COVID-19, and this is where relationships between students and teachers became valuable. Wile said,  “I think relationships for students and teachers have been very valuable this year, only being able to see each other 2 days a week.” Fleming also said something similar to this. “Looking out for each other, taking the 1 on 1 conversations between students and staff to heart.” The CVU community values relationships, teachers love their jobs here because of the student connection between everyone.

CVU has done numerous amounts of positive things during this pandemic. Both Wile and Fleming came up with multiple responses to the question What CVU has done well during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Wile, our Lead Counselor, focused a lot on how well he thinks the CVU community did on creating a schedule that provides students that come in 2 days a week with either Cohort A or B with the learning that is needed. They coped with the fact that not all students are provided with good Wifi or cellular data to access their asynchronous learning at home, but they figured out ways to make it work. Wile quoted “I think the way CVU set up our schedule was very helpful and productive this year, our focus on student well being and content this year was quite good. Going onto a 4v4 schedule made a big difference for students and staff.”

Fleming, The Director of the Learning Center, didn’t have the same view as Wile on what CVU has done well during the pandemic, but he still had positives! If you knew Rahn, he absolutely loves students and working with anyone. Fleming said, “I really think we did a great job at patience and coming up with answers on the fly.” Fleming also spoke about how teachers are taking the time to connect and see students for extra help and just seeing them, because only coming to school 2 days a week isn’t much time. 

 

photo by Debbie Seaton

Was Prom Really That Different This Year?

By Georgia Bruneau, Mon, June 7th, 2021

HINESBURG- As we know CVU prom was a little different this year. Aside from adding masks to everyone’s outfits, our biggest change was the location. Prom this year was held outside right next to the school. A lot of work went into making this prom enjoyable for everyone. There was a big tent, a dance floor, and even food trucks. That’s a first for our students here and as much fun as it was, most hope for it to be the last.

CVU senior, Maggie Bruneau voiced her opinion on the dance. “It was okay, better than how I expected it to be but, to be honest, I didn’t know what to expect. I’m a little disappointed that I will never get to experience a true high school prom but this was fun too. I appreciate the hard work the staff put in to make the night enjoyable and fun for everyone. The food trucks were cool and different, and the red carpet was really pretty throughout the school. I could tell there was a lot of effort put into it.” 

Sophomore Esther Cuneo, like Bruneau, shared the experience of her first prom. “For my first ever prom it is definitely not how I dreamt it would be. But it was fun, very close to normal, I would say it felt like life was almost normal again. But for the circumstances, it looked way better than I thought. The staff definitely put their best efforts into the decorations and it showed, I honestly didn’t think it would look that good. And the food trucks were a great bonus. As for the actual dance… I didn’t stay long. But everyone I saw looked great and seemed to be having a really good time. Overall I would say it was a success, and now our proms can only get better from here” But fortunately unlike Bruneau, that won’t be Cuneo’s last CVU prom, and like she said, “Our proms can only get better from here.”

Some of the prom chaperones have a different viewpoint on how the night really went. “Everyone came in looking great, high spirits, everyone seemed really happy, which was normal prom stuff.” Says campus supervisor Seth Emerson. “It seemed like everyone was having a really good time, the dance floor was crowded the whole time, it looked like people were having a blast! It came out better than I expected.”

Math teacher “Jersey Steve” Reinman agrees with Emerson’s lively take on the prom evening but sets a more realistic tone for the night. “Prom was totally different this year, you had to wear a mask, it wasn’t at the venue it was at CVU in the back of the parking lot, there were a lot of restrictions on what we could and couldn’t do, but that being said, prom was totally awesome this year. The food trucks out there were really cool, and way more people came than I thought.” 

As for Steve’s expectations, the night went above and beyond dealing with the restrictions we had. “But it wasn’t like prom a couple of years ago like when it was at the old lantern in Charlotte, that was a really nice place. But for what our guidelines were, I think we knocked it out of the park!” Most agree with this honest statement, for dealing with a global pandemic our prom staff really made the night “almost normal.”

Photo by Debbie Seaton

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Healing the Scars of Notre Dame

Myleigh Kilbon 6/4/21

Two years ago flames threatened to completely destroy the internationally renowned Notre Dame Cathedral, nestled in the heart of Paris. While Notre Dame wasn’t completely burned down, scars remain not only on the cathedral, but in the hearts of French citizens. The flames that tore Notre Dame down also reached the hearts of many United States citizens who watched the travesty from across the sea. Champlain Valley’s own Magali Simon-Martin, a French teacher at CVU, who was born and raised in Paris, France, was deeply affected by the fire.

Earlier this year President Emmanuel Macron visited the beautiful Notre Dame cathedral with a team of ministers and architects to check on the progress of the restoration of the cathedral, also marking the two year anniversary of the fire. Restoring the cathedral to its former glory has been deemed a symbol of French resilience, a symbol needed now more than ever amidst this global pandemic.

April 16th, 2019, at approximately 6:20 p.m., billows of smoke were spotted rising from the roof of the famous cathedral before neon orange flames were seen ripping through the sky. The fire lasted for close to 15 hours, clouding the city of Paris with smoke and despair. After the fire, the Chicago Tribune reported “The spire of the cathedral collapsed in flames, but the church’s structure was saved after firefighters managed to stop the fire spreading to the northern belfry. No deaths were reported but one firefighter was injured.”

After an investigation, the Tribune asked Parisian police about the cause of the fire, who reported that, “the cause of the massive fire isn’t yet known. The peak of the 12th century cathedral was undergoing a $6.8 million renovation project on the church’s spire and its 250 tons of lead. Officials said the fire is ‘potentially linked’ to the renovation work. The Paris prosecutors’ office ruled out arson and possible terror-related motives, and said it was treating it as an accident.”

Madame Magali Simon-Martin, french teacher at CVU and Vermont’s Foreign Language Teacher of the year, born and raised in Paris, reported that she clearly remembers the fire. “I have these vivid memories of seeing videos of people in Paris and their reactions to the fire. I could see the tears, and I could see the fear in their eyes. Afraid of what this meant for Paris,” Simon-Martin described.  When asked about how the fire affected French citizens, Simon-Martin said, “A reminder that Notre Dame is for the French people, its history. Seeing that it could burn, reminding people that it was this real thing that couldn’t last forever was scary.”

The reason that the burning of Notre Dame was so fear-inducing for the world over is because of what Notre Dame means and what Notre Dame represents. Simon-Martin described Notre Dame and the meaning of Notre Dame in France. “ It is part of the culture, it is part of the landscape, part of the ancestry, something that will always be there. You can see it from everywhere in Paris, like a statement in the Parisian sky; the bells, the visuals and the sound of France.” Simon-Martin reported that the importance of Notre Dame lies in the unity it brings, “Whether or not you are a practicing Catholic, Notre Dame brings this sense of spirituality and when you enter, there is a sense of calm and unity, but also you are surrounded by beauty and it is stunning. It is the spirit of what makes us human when we believe in something higher than ourselves, whether that is God, or simply unworldly beauty.”

The Covid-19 pandemic has hit hard for the entire world, and Simon-Martin reported that the most difficult part of the pandemic for most Parisians is simply “Joi de vivire” or the joy of life. Living and enjoying life is a large part of French culture, and not being able to enjoy a coffee or just taking your time getting from one place to another has been a struggle. Simon-Martin stated, “The most difficult part of the pandemic is how it has impacted the resilience of people; it’s a struggle, and now when you see France opening outdoors, people are eager to socialize and talk and just sit and be surrounded by people and beauty and excitement.” The importance of the restoration of Notre Dame has only increased as the joy of life for many Parisians has decreased. Simon-Martin said, “Notre Dame is at the center of Paris, the center of the French people’s history. There is this amazing building that also represents the entire history of the country. You visualize Notre Dame as France. It holds the values. It is connected to places that are statements representing education, peace, and equality, all surrounding Notre Dame. Life surrounds Notre Dame, and you have a mix of people representing the world surrounding Notre Dame.” For many, Notre Dame represents the idea of joy of life.

Notre Dame is a symbol for life and beauty. Simon-Martin stated that Notre Dame is this symbol of unity that illustrates how people can be so creative and so strong. That building shows the strength of human beings and the ability to reflect on history. Simon-Martin reccounted the experience of Notre Dame specifically speaking about the incredible music coming from the famous organ of Notre Dame. “Notre Dame shines all over the world, it is the most visited monument in the world by tourists, and French people, and even Parisians who get to see it every day. The organist of Notre Dame, on a very personal level, played the organ when I got married in Paris. The music and the organ was saved, saving the music of Notre Dame. The organ is visually stunning, and when the organ is played there is a special sound that resonates, in Notre Dame the sound is specific. Even if you aren’t religious, you can be religious at Notre Dame. It is at its core.”

 

The restoration of Notre Dame has greatly impacted mainly the lives of local Parisians, specifically those living in the neighborhood. “All around Notre Dame is closed right now too, so you can’t cross to the park the way you used to. But there is hope. At the same time, with the pandemic, people are not traveling much, it has affected mostly the Parisians that live in the neighborhood, because that neighborhood is dead. After the fire people were unhappy because they found some led; people were concerned for their children’s health, because the fire caused those led fumes to get into the air and there was some controversy around that,” Simon-Martin said. But the importance of Notre Dame outweighed any controversy or concerns. Simon-Martin reported that, “Everybody said it has to be rebuilt. Right away rich people gave a lot of money, so it’s going to be funded by the French government, but also with private funds. And it was immediate; the day after the fire, money started to arrive. Rich people started pledging their money to Notre Dame, to save the cathedral, and the culture it brings to France.”

Notre Dame is more than a cathedral, it acts as the heart of a city, the heart of a country. “Every person that knows Notre Dame has a memory, whether it is a feeling, or an impression, the  building itself is almost a person,” said Simon-Martin. And the most important piece of it is how one building could bring the world together. “It’s like what we call the French heritage. It goes across social status and classes, genders, ages.” The restoration of Notre Dame will help to restore the hearts of French people, and global citizens because, as said by Simon-Martin, “Notre Dame is part of the culture, it is part of the landscape, a statement in the Parisian sky.”

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Jobs and Summer Activities for Students!

By Erin Fina

HINESBURG, VT–This school year is quickly coming to an end and summer activities are quickly approaching! This summer there are plenty of events for students to get involved in for credit and for non-credit interest based activities through CVU, UVM, and a list of Summer Jobs!

CVU OFFERINGS

For all in-coming 9th grade students:

You have the opportunity to attend the classic CVU Summer Camp! This is open to all 9th graders and is known to help with a positive transition from middle school to high school. There are 2 sessions (with the option of attending both), with Session A the weeks of July 5 and July 12, 2021 and Session B, weeks of July 19 and July 26, 2021. Students have the opportunity to pick one of the following interesting areas to explore in the camp, such as Outdoor Recreation,  Exploring the Arts, and Into the Wild. This is an outstanding opportunity for upcoming highschoolers to get to know their peers from other schools, explore the CVU building, participate in interest based activities and have a ton of fun! Rising 9th graders can sign up HERE and contact Rick Kinsman,  cvusummercamp@cvsdvt.org, with any questions. 

For ALL CVU Students:

There are FREE summer course offerings that will be hosted by CVU over the summer! YOU can receive CVU credit for the completion of the following courses! Some of the many courses range from Writing Prose and Creative Writing to Public Speaking and Anatomy & Physiology to The Oceans and You, among others. Students are able to earn CVU credit for completion of the course, with many earning up to .5 for the subject area. Dates and times vary from course to course, but you can find all of the courses and more information HERE and fill out THIS ONLINE FORM if you are interested. Email Monica Carter for additional information, mcarter@cvsdvt.org.

For ALL CVU Students:

Interested in an interest based workshop this summer? CVU is hosting many workshops for students looking to keep busy over the summer! Workshops range from Computer Programming to Abenaki Culture and Heritage to Paint and Poetry to a Vermont Adventure Week and many more, all free of charge! You cannot earn CVU credit for these courses, but it is a great way to connect with peers, teachers and staff, explore interest- based fields and have fun after such a long, isolated past year. You can find all of the workshops listed here (scroll down to the CVU Workshops) HERE and fill out THIS ONLINE FORM if you are interested in any of the workshops. Contact Monica Carter for any additional information, mcarter@cvsdvt.org.


UVM COURSE OFFERINGS:

Attention CVU Students! You are able to register for UVM Pre-College Courses for the Summer 2021 and the Fall 2021. Most courses are fully-online, but courses like Chemistry will be taught from a Hybrid Learning approach. You are able to receive college credit for the completion of these courses. Additional information can be found HERE and please don’t hesitate to contact your House Counselor about any additional information. 

 

 SUMMER JOBS

*These are some local businesses that are looking to hire potential employees. Age limitations, work experience, job positions needs, etc at specific locations might vary from business to business. Contact businesses directly for any questions and concerns. 

“Part-2″ WORK WITH KIDS

In need of a Summer job? Like working with children?  Part-2 is the perfect place for you! Part-2 is hiring teens like you for preschool and school-aged summer camp positions, at their 8 locations around Chittenden County, such as Shelburne, Williston (Allen Brook School), Montpelier, Richmond, among others. You can apply HERE and Inquire within their website, http://www.parttwokids.com/home.html for additional information. 

 

SWEET ROOTS FARMS (formerly Charlotte Berry)-CHARLOTTE

Need a summer job? Former Charlotte Berry Farm, located just off of Route 7 in Charlotte, newly named Sweet Roots Farms is hiring for summer positions for 2021! Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, creemees, baked goods and more, Sweet Roots is a great place for a hard-working, berry- lover! Please email sweetrootsfarmers@gmail.com for more information.

 

CUCINA ANTICA- SHELBURNE 

Delicious pizza, salads, calzones, pasta and more, right in the heart of the Shelburne Village! Located just across from the Shelburne Supermarket and right next to Aubuchon Hardware, Cucina Antica offers delicious Italian Cuisine. They are hiring now for positions including Servers, Counter/Phones, Dish, Kitchen. Some experience is preferred, but not necessary. APPLY NOW AT https://www.bistrocucinaantica.com/form-job-application.

 

AGAVE- WILLISTON

Located in the Maple Tree Place in Williston, Agave is a delicious Mexican restaurant specializing in Mexican-inspired food and drinks! They are short on staff and looking for students like you to join their team. Inquire on their website via the Contact Form, https://www.agavevt.com/form-contact-us for job opportunities. 

 

HEALTHY LIVING- WILLISTON

As of September 24th, 2021, the Williston Healthy Living was officially opened and ready for business! They are looking to hire passionate and hard-working people to join their team, through paid positions such as Dishwashing, Cashier, among others. Visit https://recruiting.paylocity.com/Recruiting/Jobs/All/f6749321-6721-467b-9755-be942a498f22/ROAD-TO-HANA-INC for more information or inquire within at 129 Market St. Williston, VT 05495.

 

TRADER JOE’S- SOUTH BURLINGTON

Trader Joe’s is looking for passionate, hard-working and welcoming employees to join their business in helping to create a warm and friendly shopping experience, as members of their “Crew” team. Duties include Working on teams to accomplish goals, Operating the cash register in a fun and efficient manner, Bagging groceries with care, Stocking shelves, Creating signage to inform and delight customers, Helping customers find their favorite products, among other things. If you are interested in becoming part of the Trader Joe’s Crew, inquire within the South Burlington location (200 Dorset St, South Burlington, VT 05403) or apply at https://traderjoes.avature.net/careers/ApplicationMethods?jobId=8820. Must be at least 16-years old.

 

LANTMANS- HINESBURG

Lantman’s Market; a locally owned quality market since 1925, located in the heart of Hinesburg is hiring NOW for cashiers, stock floor workers, deli personnel who are “available weekends, evenings and/or daytimes.” Potential employees should be “reliable and enthusiastic to provide friendly customer service to our community” and if this sounds like you, apply today via https://lantmansmarket.com/employment-application.html. Age limitations for some departments range for 18+, but also in need for teen positions. Apply Today!

 

 WAKE ROBIN- SHELBURNE

Wake Robin is a retirement community, located just beyond the Shelburne Museum. They are looking for people who demonstrate strong customer service skills and a desire to work with an active population of seniors, and if this sounds like you, apply today! They are looking for Cooking, Cleaning and Wait Staff among others. Apply at https://www.wakerobin.com/contact-us/employment/ or Inquire within

 

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Sports Update 5/25/21

CVU SPORTS REPORT MAY 25TH

By Erin Fina

Boys Tennis: 

The Boy’s Tennis Team moved to 8-4 on the season while visiting South Burlington on Monday, defeating them. They visit Mt. Mansfield for their last regular season match, Tuesday, May 25th at 3:30pm. 

 

Girls Tennis: 

The Redhawk Girls Tennis team moved to 6-4 this season, but were defeated by South Burlington on Monday, 3-4. CVU Girls Tennis hosts MMU for their senior day and last regular season game on Tuesday, May 25th at Davis Park at 4:30pm. 

 

Girls Lacrosse:

The CVU Girls Varsity Lacrosse team is on a roll, hosting and defeating Burlington 17-5 on Monday, on their Senior Day. They visit South Burlington on Thursday for a BIG rematch under the lights at Munson Field (S. Burlington Turf) at 7pm. 

 

Boys Lacrosse:

The Boys Lacrosse team has an impressive, 12-0 undefeated record thus far in the 2021 regular season. They defeated South Burlington last Friday, 18-11. They host Woodstock on Tuesday at CVU at 4:30pm. 

 

Girls Ultimate:

The Varsity Girl’s Ultimate Frisbee team is 3-6 thus far in the 2021 regular season as of May 18th. They look to host  St. Johnsbury at CVU at 4:30pm on Tuesday.

 

Boys Ultimate:

The Boy’s Varsity Ultimate Team has had an impressive 2021 season, with a 8-2 record. They defeated Colchester last Saturday, 15-6 and this Tuesday (May 25th)  look to visit South Burlington at 7pm for an under the lights game.

 

Baseball: 

The Varsity Boys Baseball Team had themselves a season thus far, going 12-3 thus far. They were defeated by Rice on Saturday, May 22nd 0-1, but look to host St. Johnsbury on Tuesday at 4:30pm.

 

Softball:

The Varsity Softball Team went 2-13 this season and defeated the MMU Cougars last Thursday, 15-3. Their game vs St Johnsbury on Tuesday, May 25th has been cancelled, awaiting information about rescheduling. They do look forward to visiting Burlington on Thursday for a rematch, 4:30pm at Leddy Park. 

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How does CVU Feel About Governor Scott’s Three-step Plan?

By Georgia Bruneau, Mon, May 10th, 2021

HINESBURG- With now three effective vaccines and nearly 50% of Vermont’s population vaccinated, we can construct goals and a plan to bring back “normal” life.  Governor Phill Scott has come together with a three-step plan.  The first part of the plan started April 9th; this includes ending travel quarantine requirements, and instead replacing them with testing unvaccinated individuals in less than three days of returning to Vermont. Step two of this plan starts in May and involves increasing the number of people in gatherings inside and outside. The third and final part of the plan is lifting the mask mandate on July 4th. “We’re in the last laps of this race and this plan shows how we can finish strong if we all do our part,” said Governor Scott. 

However, some Vermont residents have worries and concerns about this “good news.” “I would like to have current data on how often the disease is spread while people are still vaccinated,” said CVU math teacher Hannah Carey. Carey also says “If we can have gatherings of 150 inside, non-spaced, and no masks by July 4th, why do I have to wear a mask in a classroom with 27 other kids next year? Where’s the logic here? If you’re suggesting I wear a mask in the fall in my classroom to prevent getting Covid, then why is okay for other people to attend a 150 person wedding inside without being spaced, and you’re eating? How is that all going to work?” 

But teachers aren’t the only ones who have an opinion on the matter. A student from CVU speaks on behalf of the student body about the news: “I feel really excited about the fact that masks could possibly be gone in the near future. If the plan is truly effective it would be an amazing weight lifted off of many people’s shoulders. I think that we are partially on the right track. I think many people have good intentions and the vaccine is a great step in the right direction but many people are getting more relaxed about covid. I don’t have many worries about people not wearing masks by July 4th if everyone sticks to the guidelines; my only worry would be that we push it too fast and we begin to see a spike in cases and then we have to take more steps backward,” says sophomore Anna Morton.

Overall the CVU community is ecstatic about the Governor’s plan for normalcy, but we still seem to be slightly skeptical of the idea. Is it illogical like Carey said? Or a step in the right direction as Morton believes?

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CVU Sports This Week 5/14/21

Jett Barbic

 

Lacrosse

The boys lacrosse team defeats Middlebury and Rutland this past week and moves to 8-0 on the season

 

The girls lacrosse team lost against South Burlington

 

 

Baseball

The baseball team came back from 7 down against Burlington to win 14-12. And now are looking forward to their rematch with South Burlington on 5/15

 

Ultimate

The boys ultimate lost this week against Burlington which ended their undefeated season

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Social Justice Has Been a Pandemic Priority at CVU

Myleigh Kilbon

HINESBURG, VT– At the end of my sophomore year, I had a very basic grasp on the concept of social justice, but not enough to talk about it to a group of teachers, who (I assumed) were experts on the topic. So when I was approached by the advisor of the Social Justice Alliance (SJA) to help with inservice presentations before school started, it was fair to say I was a little hesitant. I went to meetings, I did research, I talked with current SJA members, and I learned. I went into these presentations expecting the teachers to correct everything I said, but they listened. This was the day I realized I had the power to make a difference, to make a real change.

From the day we are born, we live in this world of “right” and “wrong”. As we grow, we develop our own innate sense of what it is to be fair and what it is to be unfair. Justice is something that we, as a society, strive for. At CVU, we have worked to put into place systems that ensure that: our students are part of a community where each student has a right to equality; they feel they are a part of a supportive learning environment; systemic change is implemented to uplift marginalized groups; and all students voices are not only heard, but valued.

Just over a year ago, a group of juniors at CVU decided that it was finally time for a concrete change. All of the Social Justice clubs at CVU were in a place where they were respected but not listened to unless it was convenient. CVU’s Environmental Action (EnAct) Club, Bring Change to Mind (mental health) Club, Racial Alliance Committee (RAC), Gender Sexuality Alliance (GSA), Students Awareness Change and Training (ACT) for sexual violence, and our Unified Advocacy Club (UAC), came together February of 2020 to form an alliance of social justice related organizations in order to push our agendas and make CVU a more inclusive community.

Our collection of clubs has worked to achieve our goals of students rights, education, and equality. Our broad objectives for this inclusion were;

  • Maintain safety, well being, and comfort, 
  • Create a comfortable environment so that students can report incidents in confidence that the administration will listen.
  • Prevent threats of discrimination, alienation, or persecution
  • Construct a place of understanding.
  • Ensure that every member of the CVU community is equal.
  • Maintain core values of freedom, peace, and justice
  • Create a holistically supportive learning environment
  • Reform curriculum and increase student education regarding race, identity, sexual violence, bullying, non-neurotypical peers, and general sensitivity.
  • Expand education and training for faculty, staff and administrators to ensure problems are dealt with compassionately.
  • Develop citizens that contribute positively to their environment and value inclusion.

The sheer number of concrete actions that we have accomplished this year alone has surpassed the actions of all of our individual clubs combined over the past several years. We have worked in the areas of policy to: collaborate with house directors and administration to review existing disciplinary policies and implementation, created pamphlets and resources for students outlining new policy implementation, the implementation of surveys, accessible reporting options, and more. We have worked in the areas of education to: create a race and ethnic studies, and gender studies course, create a social justice credit, and refine existing curriculum to include social justice issues. We have done faculty presentations, student forums, and teacher forums to spread our message. We have created a website and a podcast (The Round Table) as well as creating a more accessible reporting form for students who face injustices.

The Social Justice Alliance has taken this year as an opportunity to work to guarantee all students at CVU have equal rights, status, opportunities, and treatment. The idea of social justice can be a bit daunting at first, I know from experience. But knowing that talking about these issues can make our world even a little bit of a better place, why not take the risk?

Reach out to the CVU Social Justice Alliance for more information about social justice and what social justice looks like in our community.

Social Justice Alliance Website

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CVU Students on Board the Vaccination Bandwagon

By Erin Fina

HINESBURG- A recent poll conducted at Champlain Valley Union High School shows that out of 274 CVU students, 52% of CVU students have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 Vaccine, and 19% are fully vaccinated. 

This is great news, as Vermont’s Governor, Phil Scott, just gave the thumbs-up to give full access for the vaccine among Vermont teens 16-18 starting on April 17, 2021. Scott mentioned the importance of getting the group vaccinated as obviously it’s more steps in the fight to end the pandemic but also because, “after all they’ve had to give up over the last year, to allow [the age group] to have some sort of a normal graduation,” Scott said in article recently published by VT Digger. 

As of now, Vermont is ranked #1 nationally in vaccination rates, with 44% of Vermonter’s fully vaccinated and 62% with at least one dose. 

Vermonters throughout the state have been eager to return to normal life and here at CVU High School, we are no different. With 81% +/- of the CVU student body saying that they plan to get vaccinated if they haven’t already done so already, an anonymous surveyor stated that the reason that they choose to get vaccinated was to “protect those around me and reach the herd immunity the world needs to return to the original normal”. Herd immunity, as Anthony Fauci explained, is reachable when 80% of the population is immune to the virus. 

At CVU, if all goes as planned, the CVU community could have the potential to reach full herd immunization rates by the start of the fall semester of 2021. 

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Tackle the Culture, Not Teen Girls

Rally: CVU Dance Canceled for Allowing Sexual Harassment

Madeleine Connery

With horrifying sexual assault cases jumping to headlines, the eyes of many teenage girls have widened in terror. Navigating an environment that has managed to normalize and even promote sexual harassment is no ideal task. High school girls often find themselves trapped in belittling experiences yet silenced by the fact that these experiences are deemed “normal.” 

CVU may be at fault for creating one of these very environments. An annual fall dance, formerly known as “Rally in the Valley,” has long held an infamous reputation for its rampant objectification towards the young girls who attend. One of the first to speak out about this dance was unsurprisingly a teenage girl herself. 

Lena Kerest is a CVU senior and a member of the Social Justice Alliance and Student Awareness, Change & Training Committee at CVU. She is also a former attendant of this fall event. “The dance afterward definitely really shocked me and… opened my eyes to a culture at CVU that I thought was extremely problematic,” Lena describes as her ninth-grade experience.

The “Rally in the Valley” event contained two main parts: A performance of group dances, then a school-wide dance that followed. The former was not the problem, as Lena will agree, “A lot of athletes enjoy the camaraderie of making a dance together… so there will be a push to keep that in place.” However, the same cannot be said about the school-wide dance that followed.

“While the event is supposed to promote school spirit and the athletic teams, people utilize [the school-wide dance] for something different which is… a dance where girls go from guy to guy and it’s extremely objectifying cause it’s not a personal relationship and a lot of times it’s not consensual,” Lena describes. 

Despite this being the widespread reputation of the dance, for years the legacy of this occasion has lived on. This past year, thanks to the Social Justice Alliance’s growing momentum, the dance following Rally was finally canceled by the administration. Lena defends the school, acknowledging, “There are countless issues that are on the administration’s plate. They are obviously super busy and it’s hard to draw attention to these things when you don’t have a lot of people behind the issue.” 

Perhaps the lacking student voice was a symptom of an underlying struggle. When it comes to reporting these problems, teen girls are often met with a wave of dismissal. Teen dances are over-emphasized in the media. Our present society has placed an exaggeration on the American adolescent experience. Hiding behind cliché, coming-of-age teen sagas is a pressure to live high school a certain way. Underclassmen girls often feel they must attend events such as Rally– even if its reputation unsettles them, because “you’re only young once.” Yet, when they describe their experience afterward, their trauma goes dismissed by the fact that they were aware of the risks; thus continues an exhausting cycle. 

It’s hard to protect young girls when the danger that they face is disguised as a part of the typical high school experience. Though Rally itself was a horrendous occurrence in Redhawk history, Lena believes that silently clicking “delete” would be just as bad. “We want the administration to speak out about why Rally’s being canceled… It’s not something that we should just be silent about,” she states.

Though the administration as a whole has yet to release a formal statement, administrator Katherine Riley agreed with Lena on the flaws of the dance, acknowledging, “The climate of the Rally dance… was not aligned with helping people feel safe, comfortable, and included.” 

High schools everywhere are long overdue for a reevaluation of their environment. When it comes to sexual harassment, hesitation leaves room for devastation. According to one study done by the American Association of University Women, “In the 2010-11 school year, 56% of 7-12th grade girls experienced sexual harassment in school or online from peers.” Statistics prove the severity of this threat, though the only people who seem to be acting on it are young women themselves. But action based solely on self-defense is illogical— a target should not need to be their own bodyguard. If sexual harassment is to be tackled, the root at fault is the culture.

Striving to rebuild this toxic teen environment, Lena does not hesitate to identify problems. “A lot of really bad behavior at CVU is normalized… like how people make comments to each other, do things over social media that are not beneficial to anybody- not safe, but then they just go untalked about, unreported because it’s just what’s normal in CVU culture, [and] in culture in general.” 

The need for addressing this harmful culture has never been greater. Recent events at the nearby University of Vermont have further proved this. Students at this university organized a walkout on Monday, May 3rd after numerous injustices occurred involving sexual assault. These injustices are not only disturbing for fellow students of UVM but young women everywhere. For many high school girls, the excitement of college has dwindled into fear. Lena, being a senior herself, exemplifies how this has impacted her personally, “All of this sexual assault stuff coming out of UVM has been weighing on me a lot and so… I don’t feel my best.”

Although high schools still have strides to go till young women feel safe and supported, the cancellation of the Rally in the Valley dance is an inch in the right direction for CVU. Though its existence was long overdue for abolition, reparations are on the horizon. The scars of sexual harassment are not fast-fading; Lena speaks to the pain of all former female attendants when she states, “Rally was just seen as normal but really, it shouldn’t have been. It should not have been normal at all.”

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New Virus, New Mask Mandates, New College Application Process?

Hailey Chase

HINESBURG, VT– Two words of 2020 were “new normal,” and that can even be applied to CVU’s seniors’ different college application process. From travel restrictions to different class scheduling at CVU, this “new normal” has had a significant impact on seniors’ college decisions.

CVU senior Sunny Premsankar expressed how this year’s college process was unique for her. Sunny was unable to visit any schools before sending in her applications—something most seniors can relate to. Like Sunny, most seniors utilized online resources for the majority of their college research. Many colleges and universities now offer virtual self-guided tours; prospective students can click through campus and get an idea of what schools may look like. Thankfully, Sunny was able to visit the school she committed to, but only a few days before the May 1st National Commitment Day deadline. Another obstacle she had to overcome was the final semester of junior year; the world was shutting down, school was online, but AP classes continued to teach new material. 

“End of the school year-wise, I think it was harder for AP class and for AP exams. For Chem at least, we had to do three units online before the AP exam. It was definitely harder to end with a good grade,” the student noted. Sunny’s experience in her final semester as a junior is something almost all students at CVU can relate to; when COVID hit and school was online, it was a major change that didn’t discriminate—absolutely everyone was affected. For juniors and seniors enrolled in AP classes last spring, that meant a greater challenge to learn the new material in preparation for finals and the AP exam. 

CVU Guidance Counselor Jen Bickel-Hayes weighed her opinion on the class of 2021’s college application experience as well. On the topic of new test-optional policies, she explained, “One of the biggest changes was that most schools took a test-optional approach with their testing policy. This means that applicants were able to submit test scores if they felt they would be beneficial to their application. However, if they chose not to send test scores, the schools would not view this negatively when considering a student for acceptance,” which many students were grateful for. In Vermont, SAT and ACT testing sites began canceling test sessions in March 2020, and there were little to no tests offered until September of 2020. The guidance counselor also touched on new COVID-related writing prompts on many schools’ applications as an opportunity for applicants to share how COVID has affected their life, whether it be academic or not. 

In terms of college applications for future college applicants, Bickel-Hayes believes that there are a few significant changes that are here to stay, the first one being test-optional policies at some colleges. “Many schools will remain test optional for at least next year’s application season. This is due to the fact that it is still difficult for students to take the tests or take it multiple times,” she stated. 

COVID has had an immense impact on the world—not just on CVU and its students. “New normal” policies are being implemented into every aspect of life, and the college application process is no exception. With lasting effects, from finishing junior year remotely and the inability to visit colleges, CVU’s seniors have had a much different college application process than pre-COVID classes, and now some of these changes, such as test-optional policies, are here to stay.

Welcoming Restorative Justice at CVU

Ms. Alexandra Anderson

Restorative justice, a new disciplinary system focused on individual growth, has begun to take effect in institutions around Vermont. This model, hallmarked for its focus on community involvement, conversation, and personal development, has been applied to youth legal misdemeanors around the state and more recently has reached the halls of Champlain Valley Union High School. 

Beckett Pintair, CVU Student Body President and leader of the Youth Restorative Justice Board in Williston, has seen first hand the effects of restorative justice on youth infractions. “Right now the [justice] system is not very functional; it doesn’t look at actual people.” He said, “it doesn’t actually do anything to repair the harm to the responsible party or the victim… with restorative justice they can actually learn from their crime.” 

Through the Restorative Justice Board, Pintair has been able to mentor young offenders, write “creative and constructive” learning contracts and learn about the larger scale impacts of criminal justice reform. “Really, what restorative justice is about is repairing the harm yes, but also building connections, so that the community and the person is stronger and can become stronger out of that,” he explains.


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CVU Tries On Reused, Recycled and Free

Ms. Asha Hickok

On Wednesday, January 15, CVU students walked into a transformed library. Tables were skewed across the front of the room with piles of clothes organized by different styles and pieces. 

Throughout the day, groups of students filtered through the Clothing Swap, chatting with friends and shopping for donated, second-hand clothing pieces. 

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CVU’s third annual clothing swap has come and gone. The first two swaps occured last year, one in the fall and the other in the spring. This year, the clothing swap was combined into one event hosted in the library in mid-January, and produced a varied crowd of “shoppers.”

“My favorite aspect is there’s a lot of different people shopping and the normalization of second hand [shopping],” states Robin Lauzon, one of the main organizers of the Clothing Swap. Lauzon explains the roots of the swap and how a small idea was able to grow into a successful and multi-purposed event. Continue reading

CVU Dives for Special Olympic Events

Mr. Bennett G. Townley

The 2019 CVU Cool Schools Penguin Plunge in Burlington, VT made another huge impact on Saturday, February 2nd, 2019, for Special Olympics of Vermont. There were over 176 participants, according to a school poster that was located in the hallway.  

The Cool Schools are schools with Unified Sports Programs, which allow uniquely abled and intellectually disabled students to play school sports such as basketball, bocce, and bowling. The Unified Sports Team has a coach like any other sports team, but the biggest difference is that there are typically non-disabled students, known as partners, to help individually coach students when they need extra help.

“3232” – Courtesy of Heather Glenn Photography

Rahn Fleming, CVU Learning Center Director, stated, “The Penguin Plunge is important to CVU because it is a chance and an opportunity for us to live our message of inclusion and singleness of purpose.”  Fleming also stated that the first year CVU only had a small crew, which comprised between fifty and a hundred participants in 2013. Peter Booth, a math and Nexus teacher at CVU said that the first Penguin Plunge in 1995 had only ten people and that has increased significantly, growing to over 2,000 plungers in Vermont.

Booth, an avid Plunger and parent of a child with a disability, stated, “The PP [Penguin Plunge] is so important to CVU because (a) it raises so much money for Special Olympics Vermont and (b) it supports people in our community with disabilities.”

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Amnesty International Advocates Locally, Sees Success Globally

Ms. Alexandra Anderson

Amnesty is one of CVUs most established clubs, working in tandem with the international organization Amnesty International, whose central mission is to combat human rights violations globally. From events such as Write for Rights, where students write letters to foreign or domestic leaders about injustice, and the annual Eastern Regional Conference in Boston, Amnesty gives students a platform to create genuine change.

Katherine Riley, CVU Amnesty Advisor for the past 19 years, is a passionate advocate for Amnesty and its goals. “The mission as a whole is to bring to light social injustices, human rights abuses around the world,” she explained. She is emphatic about the necessity of high schoolers involvement in global issues, stating, “at the highschool level there’s an opportunity to raise awareness about injustice and also bring to light the reality for students that their actions can make a difference.” Due to its connection to the larger organization, the goals of the individual branch can be realized by joint forces globally, giving students the satisfaction of inciting real and genuine change.

Image Courtesy of Amnesty International

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CVU Looks to Hire New School Resource Officer

Mr. Sean Garey

In recent years gun violence in schools has become too common. Parents, teachers, lawmakers, and students are all demanding change. They all want safer schools. One of the methods being used to achieve this goal is a School Resource Officer (SRO).

After recent tragedies in schools across America, there has been talk of CVU hiring an SRO. An SRO is a career law enforcement officer with sworn authority. They are deployed by an employing police department or agency in a community-oriented policing assignment, to work in collaboration with one or more schools. According to the National Association of School Resource Officers, only “42 percent of public schools reported that they had at least one [School Resource Officer] present at least one day a week.” Some people ask if it is necessary for CVU to have an SRO. “NASRO recommends that every school have at least one carefully selected, specially trained school resource officer.”

Adam Bunting, principal of CVU, said the main role of an SRO in CVU would first be, “[To] build connections with students. The second would be to serve on student support teams.” An SRO will be just another connection students can have in school. The SRO will also be able to help students with problems outside of school.

Image result for shelburne police department

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Stress: Turn and Face the Strain

Ms. Violet Hamel-Wade

 Life is full of stressors, ranging from more traumatic sources of stress such as the death of a loved one or a serious illness, to everyday stressors such as missing a bus or arguing with your significant other.

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Image from Blue Diamond Gallery

 American Psychological Association’s annual stress report sheds light on the stress that the people around us are feeling. The report lists Generation Z, roughly anyone born after 2000, as the second most stressed generation. Teen stress is often underestimated by adults, as most teens don’t have to manage the responsibilities of adults, such as paying rent or supporting a family. Studies, like this stress report, however, help to prove that teen stress is higher than it has ever been.

It’s no secret that many CVU students are experiencing anxiety on a daily basis, all at varying levels. “Stress is a natural fight or flight response that people need,” school nurse Megan Trevithick says. “If school wasn’t stressful we wouldn’t be motivated. It’s all good practice”.

While this is true, there are many cases in which the stress of school can impact a student’s ability to learn. “If you’re emotional then you shut down. You’re not processing and absorbing information. You get stressed because you don’t understand what is going on. It becomes a cycle,” Trevithick continues. This negative cycle seems to be a reality for many CVU students.

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Behind The (Green)screen: A Look into CVU Student Council News

Ms. Elena Crites

Every-other Tuesday at 10:00 am, CVU Student Body Co-President and Student Council News Anchor, Nicole Eaton, is hard at work. Along with notorious CVU AV expert Gary Lambert, Nicole produces bi-weekly news segments in order to inform the student body on the goings-on of the CVU community.

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Nicole Eaton rocking the SCN anchor spot (and cross-promoting CVU Basketball)

 This is Nicole’s first year anchoring, and she was selected not only due to her Student Council position but also because of her strong interest in broadcasting and her experiences within the field. She says that while filming this year’s welcome video, she talked with Gary regarding her college plans to study communications as well as her experiences during an internship she had with FOX 44 and ABC Local 22.

The CVU anchor position was still yet to be filled, and it seemed like the perfect opportunity. “ I [love anchoring the SCN], just because this summer, when I was watching the anchors for the FOX 44 and ABC Local 22, it was really inspiring, and I didn’t really get a chance to actually practice the skills that I was seeing them use… [Now] I’m using [those] skills and it’s fun that people get to see me and that I get to see myself do something that I want to do in the future.” For Nicole, anchoring is not only an enjoyable extra-curricular activity, but also a great addition to the resume of a future communications major.

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The Eric Epidemic: A Look Into CVU’s Latest Fad

Ms. Elyse Martin-Smith

Kindhearted CVU junior Eric Couture has become an icon at CVU seemingly overnight during the beginning of 2019, but for a surprising reason. Small images of Couture have been placed in nooks and crannies around the school. Thanks to CVU junior Noel Bedard and some friends, it has been estimated that over 2,281 photos of Couture have been hidden around classrooms, bathrooms, and more.

The photo of Eric spotted outside of room 164, courtesy of Elyse Martin-Smith.
The photo of Eric spotted outside of room 164, courtesy of Elyse Martin-Smith.

In the beginning, the photo had started as a fun and accidental discovery between friends. They had no idea how much it would catch on in the CVU community. “Initially, our mutual friend, Avery Murray-Gurney, began messing around with the zoom on her phone camera and accidently took the photo. The photo itself was never even meant to exist,” said Noel Bedard.

“She found it inherently amusing due to Eric’s expression and therefore printed out about five of them and hid them around the school.” Bedard then asked for a copy of the photo. “Basically, I had to take it to another level.” With the help of some friends, more and more photos were placed around the school, slowly gaining more attention and positive recognition. What began as a few innocent photos quickly multiplied exponentially into a whopping multi-thousand picture operation, fueled by delightfully entertained onlookers.

Bedard and his comrades were inspired by a very dedicated and fun outlook on life. “My friend Calvin and I, Calvin being a discordian, a discordian basically being a religion devoted to pranking other people,” interested them in this daunting but epic pranking task.

The first “batch” of Erics were created on Monday, January 7th using CVU’s own library printer. Each batch consisted of 24 Erics, with merely five sheets racking up 120 Eric photos. As increasingly positive reactions emerged, so did the number of batches. The printing process became algorithmic, calculated considering defective Erics to total about 2,281 photos, which does not even include the amount that Calvin or others printed independently. The photos were meticulously and tediously hand cut before they moved onto the more fun stage of being hidden around the school.

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Racial Alliance Committee Forms to Raise Consciousness

Ms. Greta Powers

There’s a new club at CVU with the goal of addressing racism. It’s called Racial Alliance Committee, and is led by CVU’s Akuch Dau, Page Thibault, Katelyn Wong, and Prince Yodishembo.

The committee started holding official meetings a few weeks ago, and its main purpose is to raise awareness and educate others about race. Thibault says, “RAC is all about bringing race to the consciousness of CVU, because I think race goes unspoken about and it’s unaddressed in our curriculum as well as our CVU culture.”

Thibault’s purpose for the club is what initially sparked her intent for co-founding the committee. She states that last school year she felt very impassioned about recognizing Black History Month at CVU. She got some momentum with Adam Bunting and Rahn Fleming regarding education about race, and with that momentum she got students from Montpelier High School to come to CVU and give an assembly.

At that time there was an attempt at starting a Racial Alliance Committee at CVU, but according to Thibault, it didn’t work out so well due to a lack of leadership. This year, however, Thibault was determined to keep the ball rolling, and started up RAC for a fresh start.

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One of the RAC posters around CVU

Katelyn Wong joined the original group, who also provided a clear purpose for RAC. She expressed her feelings on how in today’s current political climate a lot of unacceptable things are happening  that shouldn’t be allowed. “Our mission or movement is to talk about those things with people and to start the conversation because I think that when something is uncomfortable people laugh it off and [say] ‘Oh it doesn’t happen’. I think it’s OK to be uncomfortable with these things because they’re really hard.”

Thibault also addresses the importance of RAC in connection to the majority of white students at CVU. “CVU is a great social justice community but I think that race is often left out of the conversation. You could point that to [being] such a white school, such a white state, but I think regardless it’s really important to bring it up.” Thibault also emphasizes the importance of the club creating a safe space for those of color and anyone wanting to express their feelings about race.

 

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New Courses Broaden Art Department’s Pallette

Ms. Violet Hamel-Wade

HINESBURG, VT — Two new art classes will be offered at CVU starting semester two of the 2018/2019 school year.

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Graphic Design, taught by Abbie Bowker, will occur during fourth block on white days. Bowker says that this class will “further the students understanding of design and visual communication.” Throughout the course, students will partner with the Principles of Business class that runs during the same block. “I’m looking forward to the collaboration between the classes,” Bowker says. “It creates a deeper appreciation for the team involved in creating PR [Public Relations] for a business.” 

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