Category Archives: Volume 11: Sp ’21

college

Will you take the PSATS/ SATS next year?

By Mazzy Ricklefs       

The PSATS were Wednesday, October 13th for all junior CVU students. The weekend before that, Saturday, October 9th, seniors had their first round of SATS, which will continue through October and can be taken in the winter as well. Many juniors take the SATS, too, which will become available this winter/ spring, although most retake it senior year. “I’m taking the SATS later this year, that way I can retake them next year in case I don’t do too well.” says Lucas, an 11th grader at CVU.

Lucas wasn’t really nervous or worried about taking the PSATS and planned to take advantage of the practice it will give him for SATS. The PSAT is just a practice test for the actual SAT. Though it doesn’t count for anything, sometimes people submit the scores received on it to colleges, to see. The SAT is the test that actually matters to most people and can be taken up to 2 times. The SAT is a standardized test for getting into college but not every school requires you to submit your score.

There are 3 parts to the PSAT test: Reading ( 47 multiple choice questions), Writing and Language (44 multiple choice questions), and math ( 40 multiple choice questions and 8 student produced response questions).

As far as the SATS, they are just a more complicated and longer version of the PSATS. Gabby, a senior who took the PSATS last year, states that she, “Didn’t want to go because it seemed slightly stressful but it ended up being pretty easy, just very long.” Megan, a junior that took the practice test this past Wednesday, seems to have a similar thought. “It was very consuming and I couldn’t get through all the questions in the amount of time required, so that was a little disappointing.” As far as what the process of taking the test was like, she says that ” The PSATS were very formal and we only got 5 minute breaks… weren’t allowed to leave the classroom.”

So are taking the PSATS or SATS worth it? This year 10 students opted out of taking the PSATS and it is unclear if they opted out due to the fact that both formal tests are optional this year because many colleges are not requiring them. “By going test-optional, institutions are making a definitive statement that they will not need test scores to make admission decisions this year,” the National Association for College Admission Counseling said earlier this year. For students with low-income families, however, opting out of testing is not an option because scholarships tied to test scores are only more in demand due to the pandemic effect on our economy.     

Reporter's notebook

What does it mean to be a CVU Journalist?

By: Phoebe Henderson

HINESBURG, VT– As a Junior at Champlain Valley Union High School, I wasn’t sure what to expect when joining the group of journalists for my last quarter of the year. I had little to no knowledge about what it meant to be a journalist. After completing my Creative Writing class second quarter, I learned that I have a passion for writing stories and poems. This influenced my decision to join the Journalism class taught by Amanda Terwillegar. 

My experience this year gave me the chance to dig deeper into the world of local news. I have never been one to read the newspaper or watch the news, but becoming a journalist has opened up new opportunities and experiences for me. Personally, I wouldn’t have normally chosen a writing class that involves interviewing people outside of the classroom, but doing so has taught me to speak up and become more involved with our local community.

An average day in Journalism consisted of first reading the news and sharing out amongst the class some of the top headlines from breaking news websites such as BBC, CNN, VTdigger, etc. Then we moved into editing our individual stories.

There are many different forms of journalism that we worked with, such as investigative journalism, where journalists dive deep into a certain topic, researching and interviewing different ideas (these pieces tend to be longer). A roll-in piece is a film that includes main footage of a specific topic, along with a voice over explaining what’s happening in the short video which we then sent over to the CVU Show. “Hard news” refers to breaking news and is normally a much shorter and very relevant piece. Lastly, feature articles tell you what you want to know; they take you behind the scenes and explain everything in much more depth and greater length. I worked mostly with feature and hard news pieces.   

As you know, Covid has played a major role in our education system this year. School schedules were shifted and classes were cut in half. Meaning that I was only able to experience Journalism in half a semester. Although we were cut short with time,  we made the best of it and ended up receiving a lot of consistent news regarding the pandemic that then got turned into pieces.

All of our pieces go through editing and revising once completed. Then they either get posted on the CVU Chronicle, which can be found on the CVU website, or are passed onto the CVU show!

If you are interested in writing or even just need another English credit, I highly recommend joining Journalism. It gives you a new perspective on writing and can open up new opportunities of learning filled with great experiences!

warren

CVU’s Top Three Swimming Spots!

Brennan Murdock, Fri, June 4, 2021.

Wondering where to cool off this summer while still staying local? CVU has you covered! I sent out a school wide survey to find out where CVU students enjoy swimming the most. I’m here to bring you the results in the form of a top three.

Bristol Falls

bristol

Coming in the number one spot by a large lead was Bristol Falls. This lovely location features waterfalls, swimming holes, and cliff jumping spots. Just be careful if you try the latter!

 

North Beach

north beach

The number two spot was left in a tie between Lake Iroquois and North Beach in Burlington on Lake Champlain. These locations are quite different, so choose one according to the types of beaches you prefer. North Beach is a typical sandy public beach that features a playground, benches, grills, showers, and restrooms. If that’s your thing, then this is the place for you.

Lake Iroquois, on the other hand, is a small, pristine, tributary and spring-fed lake set in the hills of mid-Chittenden County. It is a quiet and calm getaway in the countryside if that’s more of your thing.

Lake Iroquois iroqouis

 

Warren Falls warren

Lastly, in third place was Warren Falls. Located on the Mad River in Warren Vermont, it features several cliff jumping spots and swimming holes. Warren Falls is a nice alternative to Bristol Falls. Once again, be careful when cliff jumping, but most importantly, have fun!

 

cvugroup

What CVU has Learned About Covid-19

Kobey Pecor

HINESBURG, VT–I was reading a Vox news article about how the Pandemic has affected the United States and this one line struck me: “America has an opportunity to learn from its mistakes during the Covid-19 pandemic.” So, I was interested and I wanted to connect this back to my community and my school and get their point of view on how Covid has affected CVU.

I spoke with two teachers, Tim Wile (Lead Counselor) and Rahn Fleming (Director of Learning Center)  about the strengths and weaknesses of COVID-19 on CVU. 

Both Fleming and Wile both gave me similar responses to questions. They both very much value relationships  in their lives, especially what they do as their jobs.  Communication and Relationships seemed to be the heart of the conversation.

I asked, “What would you do differently to prepare for the next pandemic?”

“The first word that comes to mind is communication, Having new ideas brought up on the fly. Generating, Decimating, and following up on new   information,” said Fleming.

I asked what CVU has learned about COVID-19, and this is where relationships between students and teachers became valuable. Wile said,  “I think relationships for students and teachers have been very valuable this year, only being able to see each other 2 days a week.” Fleming also said something similar to this. “Looking out for each other, taking the 1 on 1 conversations between students and staff to heart.” The CVU community values relationships, teachers love their jobs here because of the student connection between everyone.

CVU has done numerous amounts of positive things during this pandemic. Both Wile and Fleming came up with multiple responses to the question What CVU has done well during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Wile, our Lead Counselor, focused a lot on how well he thinks the CVU community did on creating a schedule that provides students that come in 2 days a week with either Cohort A or B with the learning that is needed. They coped with the fact that not all students are provided with good Wifi or cellular data to access their asynchronous learning at home, but they figured out ways to make it work. Wile quoted “I think the way CVU set up our schedule was very helpful and productive this year, our focus on student well being and content this year was quite good. Going onto a 4v4 schedule made a big difference for students and staff.”

Fleming, The Director of the Learning Center, didn’t have the same view as Wile on what CVU has done well during the pandemic, but he still had positives! If you knew Rahn, he absolutely loves students and working with anyone. Fleming said, “I really think we did a great job at patience and coming up with answers on the fly.” Fleming also spoke about how teachers are taking the time to connect and see students for extra help and just seeing them, because only coming to school 2 days a week isn’t much time. 

 

coral

Ghost Coral 

Kaylee Eaton

Coral reefs are turning  ghostly white, causing that area to become lifeless and barren.

 Coral reefs are home to thousands of species, but half the world’s coral reefs are dying due to bleaching and without the coral, many of the tropical fish species will go extinct. 

Unfortunately, most bleaching happens due to climate change, meaning if the water temperature gets cold and doesn’t warm up fast enough the coral will die.  But as people we can’t just cut everything that gives off carbon emissions because the world relies on businesses and technology which causes mass amounts of carbon pollution. 

Scientists have found other ways to revive the dying reefs. One scientist by the name of DR David Vaughan found that cutting the coral in small pieces will grow faster and he has been using that technique in his coral farm/nurseries. 

Unfortunately, according to Frank Mars, he has found that many farms aren’t paying attention to where they relocate the new coral to because coral farms can’t be built where there has never been a reef and resilient coral can’t be grown on floating nurseries which are located on the ocean’s surface. 

Mars Coral Restoration Foundation  came up with a better idea by focusing on physically restoring the reefs that have been killed. Mars coral foundation installed more that 8,000 “spiders” which cover more than 8000 sq ft of the ocean floor in Indonesia. Spiders are cages which are helping regrow coral by providing a structure for the coral to properly re-grow on. 

A Biologist by the name of DR Tom Goreau  has put to use the biorock structure as a way to restore coral. Biorock structures are a metal frame with coral on it that is electrocuted with low voltage to stimulate the new growth.  According to a study done by Thomas J. Goreau shows that coral will grow 3-4 times faster and have higher rates of survival when biorock structures are used. 

This is an international issue; 16% of the world’s tropical reefs died in 1998 And 70% of the earth’s coral was damaged in 2016. Many have ignored this global issue but if this continuous, by 2050 it’s estimated that 90% of the coral reefs in the world will be gone.  

If the coral reefs die, costliness  will be damaged more due to flooding, hurricanes, and cyclones. And many fishermen will suffer from lack of their only income because of the lack of fish and coastal towns will suffer from lack of tourism the coral reefs would have brought in. 

20-1223 Voyager Station

Welcome to Space! 

Sawyer Thorpe  6/3/2021

By 2027 a space hotel will be opened for citizens from around the world. For a 3 and a half night stay at this hotel in orbit of our home, it will run you at $5 million USD. With accommodations for every customer, there will be portable habitats of land from around the world. With their most recent $1,000,000 USD donation goal reached, they announced that they would be able to construct the hotel that will be 200 meters in diameter with pools, trees, and portable habitats in it. 

space

“Our planned orbit and elevation for Voyager Station is 97 deg and 500-500 km. This is a sun-synchronous polar orbit that will reduce thermal stress and allow the most continuous solar power generation. There, orbit degradation and space debris risk will be nominal.” Announced OAC’s official twitter account.

Orbital Assembly Corporation’s Twitter account continuously gives updates about their progress on the orbital hotel that spread from comedic posts to construction and even features for their part-time show that runs on Youtube and other platforms.

With the possibility of space debris shutting down the entire project, the space station has plotted a course to bring minimum danger to its passengers while bringing the best experience possible for a hefty price of $5 million USD a stay. 

With help coming in from the United States’ NASA program to a private company called SpaceX, prices for space travel have considerably lowered in terms of the broad look of things. 

With comments about the articles coming to light, many are beginning to suspect that all of this planning and construction is simply talk while they find a way to take the money for themselves. With it being in the realm of possibilities, investors must use their own sense of judgement in the project. 

hunter

Redhawks Give Insight on Spring Playoffs

By Hailey Chase

HINESBURG, VT– It’s the most wonderful time of the year— playoffs! For varsity players, this is what they’ve been working for all season: a shot at being named state champions. Varsity boys/girls lacrosse, tennis, track, ultimate frisbee, baseball, and softball will all be competing in the tournament—dates TBD.

Baseball (Hunter Whitman):

 

hunter Whitman

For the strong CVU baseball team, senior and captain Hunter Whitman weighs in on the upcoming playoff season. 

“Our pitching has really set us apart—Ollie Pudvar, Braedon Jones, and Ryan Canty are all strong pitchers for us this year,” The captain also noted that his advice to the team is to take playoffs game-by-game, and to continue doing what they’ve been doing well so far.

“We just need to continue to play good defense and to hit the ball hard. Some game-changers for us this year on the offensive side have been Ryan Eaton, Ryan Canty, and Braedon Jones.” Whitman predicts that by playing “their game,” the CVU baseball team has a good chance at conquering other strong teams such as Rice, Colchester, and Essex. 

Softball (Sophia Stevens): 

sophias

Junior Sophia Stevens plays on the CVU softball team as the starting shortstop. From her last season with CVU her freshman year, her role on the team has been enlarged tenfold. Stevens is the team’s starting shortstop, has scored 7 RBI’s, and bats third in the lineup. 

Noting a strength for the softball team, Stevens contributed “One of our biggest strengths this year has been hitting and our offensive effort. Even against really challenging pitchers, we have players who are able to consistently make contact,” which she believes will be a driving factor for the team’s success in playoffs. The junior expressed that Essex is the biggest competition in the tournament, and CVU lost to them (insert score and date)

While the team is successful at the plate, the captain noted that players don’t have finalized positions on the field; “We are still trying to figure out who plays best in each position,” she said, “We’ve struggled to execute defensively and that’s contributed to our lack of confidence. We will do our best to overcome this by moving on, and learning how we can improve in the future.” Stevens’ method going into playoffs is to lead by example, and to keep the team positive.

Boys’ Lacrosse (Shane Gorman):

shane

In 2019, the boys’ lacrosse team won the State Champion title against Burr and Burton, with the help of now-senior and captain Shane Gorman. Gorman has been a force to reckon with this season, and has earned 33 goals and 24 assists in only 12 games. 

Gorman stated, “We have the talent and the people to win, it’s just a matter of coming together as a team and performing how we’ve been coached to perform.” 

According to Gorman, the teams to beat this year are Essex, Burr and Burton, and Woodstock. In terms of the team’s strengths, the captain said “Chemistry honestly,” as many of the boys have been playing together for years, “Nolan Shea, Colin Zouck, and Owen Pierce are a great group because they have been coached together for so long.”

As a captain, Gorman preaches to the team about coming together as a team, and taking these playoff games one step at a time. “We need to play our best and not become stagnant. In other words, we just need to keep improving,” he added, hoping the team will respond to his guidance.

Girls’ Lacrosse (Petra Kapsalis):

petra

Four-year varsity athlete—now-captain, Petra Kapsalis, leads the girls’ varsity lacrosse team into this year’s playoffs. The senior plays midfield alongside freshman Gretta White, who has been a key player for the team. 

In terms of the team’s strengths, Kapsalis mentioned “We have a lot of strong players for each position.” Kapsalis believes the team’s skill depth is what sets them apart from their competition; most players have well-polished skills that benefit the team on the scoreboard. 

In the regular season, Kapsalis expressed that her role was “to organize things and support younger players,” but with playoffs on the horizon, she anticipates her role to shift to “make sure everyones really focused and to get everyone hyped up and excited.” The captain touched on how her team’s leaders in the past made playoffs an exciting and ambitious time, and she hopes to replicate a similar atmosphere for her team this year.

The team is 10-4 and according to Kapsalis, their biggest competition are SB, Burr and Burton, and Rutland. The girls lost to Burr and Burton in the second game of the season, Rutland on May 1st, then finally SB on May 11, but only by two points. Kapsalis hopes that her standout players such as Lena Kerest and Madison Peet will help the team not only with skill, but also with experience—especially against these top-ranked teams.

Boys’ Ultimate (Nigel Wormser):

nigel

Nigel Wormser is one of the captains on CVU’s ultimate Frisbee boys team. This spring marks the handler’s second season on varsity, as his junior year season was cancelled due to COVID. 

Weighing in on preparing his teammates for playoffs, Wormser stated “Ultimate is a real sport that requires a lot of focus.” Wormser hopes to refine team skills in the end zone, as one of their struggles this season has been execution when it comes time to score. 

The No. 2-ranked team is 7-1 with their only loss given to Burlington High School on May 13. Wormser is relying on the team’s chemistry to be the guiding element in the team’s toolbox going into playoffs, as he stated, “This is probably the closest team I have ever been on. We have great chemistry and we all push each other.” Wormser predicts that by doing as they’ve been coached to do, keeping their focus, and calling fouls when they need to be called, the boys can place well in the tournament. 

Girls’ Ultimate (Sofia Cofino):

girls ultimate

Sofia Cofino is a senior on the girls’ ultimate frisbee team. Giving perspective on the team, the senior offers, “Our ability to work together is one of our strengths. We have so many different ages that it’s impressive how we learned to play together—and win.” 

The girls’ biggest competition in the tournament this spring is Burlington High School, and with their coach on vacation, the team has been forced to organize practices without her. Stepping in during games, the boys’ varsity coaches have given aid to the girls.

With the weather warming up, Cofino is concerned about mask-wearing during games, as are most athletes at CVU this spring. “It’s been extremely difficult to play with masks, especially when it’s warmer,” Cofino states. The senior is excited for playoffs, and will lead the team as “Spirit Captain” in these important games. 

Boys’ Tennis (Henry Bijur):

Singles and doubles player, Henry Bijur, is captain of the boys’ varsity tennis team. 

The captain predicts his team will be successful in the upcoming tournament by “Bringing our A game to every match.” Bijur suggests that the team can remain focused and competitive. “We’ve got a lot of depth,” which he hopes will lead to a good turnout. 

“Some of our best players are Ethan Lisle and Charlie Mjaanes,” Bijur claims, and hopes those key players can continue to stand out and play well in the tournament. According to the captain, the team’s biggest competition is Burlington High School.

Girls’ Tennis (Ella Kenney):

 

Ella Kenney from Williston is a senior on the girls’ tennis team, and she is co-captains with Lindsay Beer. Unfortunately, Kenney was playing 1st singles and injured her knee, and has been unable to play since the third match of the season.

Kenney gives insight to the team’s strengths: “We have brought intensity and focus to the games while learning out individual games and strengths.” The captain also mentions the varsity team is fairly new and very young. “We lost nine seniors from last season, so there are a lot of new faces. 13 to be exact,” which is a huge change for the returning varsity players.

Despite the team’s age, the girls are 7-4, with two of their losses given to South Burlington, who Kenney states is their biggest competitor in the tournament alongside BHS. 

Kenney is leading her team into a hopeful playoff tournament, and is happy with how the season has turned out so far. “This year’s season has been so much fun; it has been great to get back on the courts and be with the team. We’ve done a lot of growing, practicing, and bonding this season.” The captain expects her younger players to be nervous for playoffs, but hopes to channel those nerves into playing a clean and successful tournament. 

Track & Field (Mckenzie Marcus):

mackenzie

Mckenzie Marcus is currently a senior on the girls’ varsity track & field team at CVU. Marcus has been on the team since her freshman year and is an experienced track & field athlete. 

The girls’ biggest competitors in playoffs this year are St. Johnsbury and Essex. Marcus has observed that both teams have many strong athletes that consistently place well at meets.

Giving insight on her own team, Marcus states, “We have a really strong distance team this year. Specifically, we have some strong female athletes that are consistently improving their times, which contributes to the entire team’s success at meets.” The senior believes that if she can lead her young team consisting of mostly 9th and 10th graders, continue rebuilding, and stay competitive, the girls are capable of placing 1st or 2nd (knock on wood). 

CVU has always been a powerhouse when it comes time to win; hopefully, we can put up seven new banners in the gym to make up for last year’s canceled season. The leaders of the baseball, softball, lacrosse, tennis, and track and field teams are eager to play, and hungry to win. Schedules and scores will be posted on team web pages, and the teams’ social media will be posting upcoming games and scores.

photo by Debbie Seaton

Was Prom Really That Different This Year?

By Georgia Bruneau, Mon, June 7th, 2021

HINESBURG- As we know CVU prom was a little different this year. Aside from adding masks to everyone’s outfits, our biggest change was the location. Prom this year was held outside right next to the school. A lot of work went into making this prom enjoyable for everyone. There was a big tent, a dance floor, and even food trucks. That’s a first for our students here and as much fun as it was, most hope for it to be the last.

CVU senior, Maggie Bruneau voiced her opinion on the dance. “It was okay, better than how I expected it to be but, to be honest, I didn’t know what to expect. I’m a little disappointed that I will never get to experience a true high school prom but this was fun too. I appreciate the hard work the staff put in to make the night enjoyable and fun for everyone. The food trucks were cool and different, and the red carpet was really pretty throughout the school. I could tell there was a lot of effort put into it.” 

Sophomore Esther Cuneo, like Bruneau, shared the experience of her first prom. “For my first ever prom it is definitely not how I dreamt it would be. But it was fun, very close to normal, I would say it felt like life was almost normal again. But for the circumstances, it looked way better than I thought. The staff definitely put their best efforts into the decorations and it showed, I honestly didn’t think it would look that good. And the food trucks were a great bonus. As for the actual dance… I didn’t stay long. But everyone I saw looked great and seemed to be having a really good time. Overall I would say it was a success, and now our proms can only get better from here” But fortunately unlike Bruneau, that won’t be Cuneo’s last CVU prom, and like she said, “Our proms can only get better from here.”

Some of the prom chaperones have a different viewpoint on how the night really went. “Everyone came in looking great, high spirits, everyone seemed really happy, which was normal prom stuff.” Says campus supervisor Seth Emerson. “It seemed like everyone was having a really good time, the dance floor was crowded the whole time, it looked like people were having a blast! It came out better than I expected.”

Math teacher “Jersey Steve” Reinman agrees with Emerson’s lively take on the prom evening but sets a more realistic tone for the night. “Prom was totally different this year, you had to wear a mask, it wasn’t at the venue it was at CVU in the back of the parking lot, there were a lot of restrictions on what we could and couldn’t do, but that being said, prom was totally awesome this year. The food trucks out there were really cool, and way more people came than I thought.” 

As for Steve’s expectations, the night went above and beyond dealing with the restrictions we had. “But it wasn’t like prom a couple of years ago like when it was at the old lantern in Charlotte, that was a really nice place. But for what our guidelines were, I think we knocked it out of the park!” Most agree with this honest statement, for dealing with a global pandemic our prom staff really made the night “almost normal.”

Photo by Debbie Seaton

Notre-Dame_en_feu,_20h06

Healing the Scars of Notre Dame

Myleigh Kilbon 6/4/21

Two years ago flames threatened to completely destroy the internationally renowned Notre Dame Cathedral, nestled in the heart of Paris. While Notre Dame wasn’t completely burned down, scars remain not only on the cathedral, but in the hearts of French citizens. The flames that tore Notre Dame down also reached the hearts of many United States citizens who watched the travesty from across the sea. Champlain Valley’s own Magali Simon-Martin, a French teacher at CVU, who was born and raised in Paris, France, was deeply affected by the fire.

Earlier this year President Emmanuel Macron visited the beautiful Notre Dame cathedral with a team of ministers and architects to check on the progress of the restoration of the cathedral, also marking the two year anniversary of the fire. Restoring the cathedral to its former glory has been deemed a symbol of French resilience, a symbol needed now more than ever amidst this global pandemic.

April 16th, 2019, at approximately 6:20 p.m., billows of smoke were spotted rising from the roof of the famous cathedral before neon orange flames were seen ripping through the sky. The fire lasted for close to 15 hours, clouding the city of Paris with smoke and despair. After the fire, the Chicago Tribune reported “The spire of the cathedral collapsed in flames, but the church’s structure was saved after firefighters managed to stop the fire spreading to the northern belfry. No deaths were reported but one firefighter was injured.”

After an investigation, the Tribune asked Parisian police about the cause of the fire, who reported that, “the cause of the massive fire isn’t yet known. The peak of the 12th century cathedral was undergoing a $6.8 million renovation project on the church’s spire and its 250 tons of lead. Officials said the fire is ‘potentially linked’ to the renovation work. The Paris prosecutors’ office ruled out arson and possible terror-related motives, and said it was treating it as an accident.”

Madame Magali Simon-Martin, french teacher at CVU and Vermont’s Foreign Language Teacher of the year, born and raised in Paris, reported that she clearly remembers the fire. “I have these vivid memories of seeing videos of people in Paris and their reactions to the fire. I could see the tears, and I could see the fear in their eyes. Afraid of what this meant for Paris,” Simon-Martin described.  When asked about how the fire affected French citizens, Simon-Martin said, “A reminder that Notre Dame is for the French people, its history. Seeing that it could burn, reminding people that it was this real thing that couldn’t last forever was scary.”

The reason that the burning of Notre Dame was so fear-inducing for the world over is because of what Notre Dame means and what Notre Dame represents. Simon-Martin described Notre Dame and the meaning of Notre Dame in France. “ It is part of the culture, it is part of the landscape, part of the ancestry, something that will always be there. You can see it from everywhere in Paris, like a statement in the Parisian sky; the bells, the visuals and the sound of France.” Simon-Martin reported that the importance of Notre Dame lies in the unity it brings, “Whether or not you are a practicing Catholic, Notre Dame brings this sense of spirituality and when you enter, there is a sense of calm and unity, but also you are surrounded by beauty and it is stunning. It is the spirit of what makes us human when we believe in something higher than ourselves, whether that is God, or simply unworldly beauty.”

The Covid-19 pandemic has hit hard for the entire world, and Simon-Martin reported that the most difficult part of the pandemic for most Parisians is simply “Joi de vivire” or the joy of life. Living and enjoying life is a large part of French culture, and not being able to enjoy a coffee or just taking your time getting from one place to another has been a struggle. Simon-Martin stated, “The most difficult part of the pandemic is how it has impacted the resilience of people; it’s a struggle, and now when you see France opening outdoors, people are eager to socialize and talk and just sit and be surrounded by people and beauty and excitement.” The importance of the restoration of Notre Dame has only increased as the joy of life for many Parisians has decreased. Simon-Martin said, “Notre Dame is at the center of Paris, the center of the French people’s history. There is this amazing building that also represents the entire history of the country. You visualize Notre Dame as France. It holds the values. It is connected to places that are statements representing education, peace, and equality, all surrounding Notre Dame. Life surrounds Notre Dame, and you have a mix of people representing the world surrounding Notre Dame.” For many, Notre Dame represents the idea of joy of life.

Notre Dame is a symbol for life and beauty. Simon-Martin stated that Notre Dame is this symbol of unity that illustrates how people can be so creative and so strong. That building shows the strength of human beings and the ability to reflect on history. Simon-Martin reccounted the experience of Notre Dame specifically speaking about the incredible music coming from the famous organ of Notre Dame. “Notre Dame shines all over the world, it is the most visited monument in the world by tourists, and French people, and even Parisians who get to see it every day. The organist of Notre Dame, on a very personal level, played the organ when I got married in Paris. The music and the organ was saved, saving the music of Notre Dame. The organ is visually stunning, and when the organ is played there is a special sound that resonates, in Notre Dame the sound is specific. Even if you aren’t religious, you can be religious at Notre Dame. It is at its core.”

 

The restoration of Notre Dame has greatly impacted mainly the lives of local Parisians, specifically those living in the neighborhood. “All around Notre Dame is closed right now too, so you can’t cross to the park the way you used to. But there is hope. At the same time, with the pandemic, people are not traveling much, it has affected mostly the Parisians that live in the neighborhood, because that neighborhood is dead. After the fire people were unhappy because they found some led; people were concerned for their children’s health, because the fire caused those led fumes to get into the air and there was some controversy around that,” Simon-Martin said. But the importance of Notre Dame outweighed any controversy or concerns. Simon-Martin reported that, “Everybody said it has to be rebuilt. Right away rich people gave a lot of money, so it’s going to be funded by the French government, but also with private funds. And it was immediate; the day after the fire, money started to arrive. Rich people started pledging their money to Notre Dame, to save the cathedral, and the culture it brings to France.”

Notre Dame is more than a cathedral, it acts as the heart of a city, the heart of a country. “Every person that knows Notre Dame has a memory, whether it is a feeling, or an impression, the  building itself is almost a person,” said Simon-Martin. And the most important piece of it is how one building could bring the world together. “It’s like what we call the French heritage. It goes across social status and classes, genders, ages.” The restoration of Notre Dame will help to restore the hearts of French people, and global citizens because, as said by Simon-Martin, “Notre Dame is part of the culture, it is part of the landscape, a statement in the Parisian sky.”

nyvirus-schools-1-mediumSquareAt3X

NYC Schools to Open in Fall 2021

Hailey Chase

NEW YORK, NY– On Monday May 24, 2021, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that New York City schools can return to in-person learning in the fall of 2021 in response to relaxed COVID guidelines and increasing vaccination rates in the city.

The mayor expects that schools will be able to accommodate all students while respecting guidelines put forth by the CDC, one concerning rule being social distancing. NYC is home to over 1 million students, and the 3 feet of social distance may become difficult to obey in the highest-populated city in the United States. In response to these concerns, the mayor noted that he expects the CDC to alter social distancing guidelines between now and September. 

The mayor expects there to be a remote option, and schools will switch to remote learning on snow days to continue teaching.

Many colleges and universities have already announced a “normal” return to school in the fall, and it is likely that other cities will follow in de Blasio’s footsteps.

fair

Hula Hoops and Horses: Summer Events are Back in Chittenden county.

By Ryan Canty

VERMONT– This summer the Champlain Valley fair will once again be hosted at the Champlain Valley exposition in Essex Junction, Vermont and is set to start on August 27 and run through September 5th. The Fair will include all rides and events from previous years, while still following CDC Covid-19 guidelines. The Champlain Valley exposition will also hold other events during the summer.

horse

The First event to take place this summer was Green Mountain Barrel Racing which concluded May 21st and 22nd. GMBR is a professional barrel racing organization created to focus on fun, safety and horsemanship. Barrel racing is an event that takes place in the expositions rodeo portion. This is where horses are raced in a clover pattern around 4 barrels to see who has the fasted time

Other events taking place this will be the Tedeschi Trucks band happening on July 4th and the PRIMUS – A Tribute to the Kings happening October 2nd. PRIMUS is a heavy metal band that will be on tour all summer.

Other events that are not taking place at the Champlain Valley Expo. have also been scheduled for this summer. The Festival of Fools in downtown Burlington wil take place on Church street from July 30th to August 1st. This event is a curated festival of street theater created to engage the community through the celebration of circus arts, music and comedy for family audiences. The acts headlining this year will be Snap Boogie, Secret Circus, Pogo Fred, The Wet Ones, and more!

 

image courtesy of Church Street Marketplace
image courtesy of Church Street Marketplace
Image courtesy of Wall Street Journal

Stand Up for the Lake

Racers at the 2020 SUFTL
Racers at the 2020 SUFTL

By: Phoebe Henderson, June 1st 2021

BURLINGTON, VT– In early August 2021 (the specific date has not been decided yet), the 13th annual Stand up for the Lake event will take place at the Burlington Surf Club, hosted by the team of Wnd & Wvs, Hula, The Spot and The Spot on the Dock. This event will be filled with activities and celebrations on the waterfront. 

I spoke to Jeff Henderson, creative director and team member of Wnd&Wvs and Hula, about the event and what’s expected for this year:

“Stand up for the Lake is a paddle board race with probably around a few hundred competitors. There are two races: a six-mile race for the elite athletes and a three-mile recreational race. Basically, there’s a course on Lake Champlain and you start on the beach and then you ride the course and race on a 14-foot paddle board against men and women who also like to paddle race. It’s a day filled not only with the race but a fun party. There’s usually food trucks and it’s really a great place for the stand-up paddle community to get together and have a fun time.”

 

paddle 2

How will the event look compared to last year’s?

“This will be the first year after a lot of the Covid restrictions, so we’re hoping to get even more people because we’re not limited to I think it was 150 last year, there will be no limit and there will definitely be loosened mask requirements. I think a lot of people with their mentality will be a lot more joyous that they’re out on the lake and you know feel like they’ve gotten their lives a little bit back to normal, so I think it’s going to be a really fun event this year after what we went through last year.”

What can people do to be involved?

“Really the event is mostly about community and not so much the competition, although it does get very competitive. We normally have a cash prize of $3,000 that goes out to the top five winners of the race. We have a great community in Burlington, a lot of people that either work with the event or just friends who are just big fans of what we’re doing, they often want to help out with the event. Originally the event was a fundraiser for the Burlington Sailing Center, but for the last five years it hasn’t been. There are also opportunities to sort of come and be at the event on a sponsor level if you want to kind of showcase your (usually water sport-related) business or product, people can come and set up tents and usually those folks also offer prizes or goodie bags that type of thing for the racers. There’s lots of opportunities to be a part of the event even if you’re not into stand up paddling.”

Who organizes it?

“Primarily, Stand Up for the Lake was started I think even before Wnd and Wvs started, and it was just a group of people that like to paddle. But stand up paddle is a sport and our team wanted to basically have a party and get some friends together and have some light competition. Then Wnd and Wvs really took it over. Now it’s become part of a bigger sort of community with the Hula project down on the waterfront and the Burlington Surf Club as well as Wnd and Wvs and you know we’re just trying to make it bigger and better every year.”

Learn what it takes to become a stand up paddle board racer, or stop by to watch and experience the amazing facilities that Burlington Surf Club has to offer! 

Link to Burlington Surf Club: http://www.burlingtonsurfclub.com/

Sample schedule of SUFTL events from 2020: https://www.standupforthelake.com/

hannaford

How Hannaford is Handling Food Waste

By Shayne Waite

Hannaford, one of the Eastern Regional Food Chains, is doing its part in reducing food waste.

Thousands of people shop at Hannaford daily, but almost 40% of the food on the shelf never gets sold, leading to it going into the landfill. Here in Vermont, it is more regulated than other states due to our very progressive composting law. 

During a WCAX interview with George Parmenter, sustainability manager at a Hannaford based in Maine, said, “When food gets wasted, it typically goes to a landfill. Not so much in Vermont because you guys have very progressive laws about food waste bans, but most everywhere else… it ends up in a landfill.” Parmenter continued, “last year Hannaford achieved its goal of sending no food waste to landfills, and that includes all of its 183 stores in New England and New York. Hannaford says the zero food waste program kept 65 million pounds of food waste from reaching landfills last year.”

fruit

How this works is through inventory management and pulling food that is clearly out of date or isn’t going to sell.  Over 10,000 pounds of food cannot be sold, but it still can be eaten, which gets donated to food banks across the state to feed people in need. According to State officials, most, if not all, grocery stores are sorting food waste because it’s the law.  Brian Phelps, the Produce Manager at Hannaford in Williston, says all produce that goes bad or is damaged goes into the compost bin and none of it goes into the landfill.

People should be encouraged by local stores to do their part in making sure no food gets to a landfill and also do it in their own home by composting as well.

drac

Wacky Ways to Encourage Vaccination

Jagger Lehouiller  5/20/21

WILLISTON VT– With vaccines rapidly rolling out around the world, hospitals and communities are finding ways to make the vaccine fun, a little more interesting, and more enticing for those who are reluctant.  

Many US states are getting involved. Connecticut is offering a free fountain  drink at select restaurants and stores for those who can provide a vaccination record; Connecticut is now also leading 4th in vaccination rates as of 5/21/21 in the US. 

bran

Not only is the US finding ways to draw in the community; it’s global. Even Romania is offering vaccines at Dracula’s Castle! According to the BBC, “Medics with fang stickers on their scrubs are offering Pfizer shots to everyone who visits the 14th-century Bran Castle in central Romania.”

Also in Washington and Wisconsin,  select tap houses they are offering a free beer with proof of vaccination referred to as a “shot and chaser”.

Vermonters are getting coupons for a free ice cream with vaccination record.  According to the Vermont Department of Agriculture,  “All the participating creemee vendors have joined in this effort to help protect the public from the coronavirus by covering part of the cost of each creemee,” the agency wrote on its website. “The coupons are limited to the first 10,000 people who receive a vaccine dose on a first-come, first serve basis, until all coupons have been claimed.”

With vaccination rates on the rise, and new incentives getting people vaccinated, things are looking up for our communities.

camping-stuff-free-vector-and-png-camping-icons

Jobs and Summer Activities for Students!

By Erin Fina

HINESBURG, VT–This school year is quickly coming to an end and summer activities are quickly approaching! This summer there are plenty of events for students to get involved in for credit and for non-credit interest based activities through CVU, UVM, and a list of Summer Jobs!

CVU OFFERINGS

For all in-coming 9th grade students:

You have the opportunity to attend the classic CVU Summer Camp! This is open to all 9th graders and is known to help with a positive transition from middle school to high school. There are 2 sessions (with the option of attending both), with Session A the weeks of July 5 and July 12, 2021 and Session B, weeks of July 19 and July 26, 2021. Students have the opportunity to pick one of the following interesting areas to explore in the camp, such as Outdoor Recreation,  Exploring the Arts, and Into the Wild. This is an outstanding opportunity for upcoming highschoolers to get to know their peers from other schools, explore the CVU building, participate in interest based activities and have a ton of fun! Rising 9th graders can sign up HERE and contact Rick Kinsman,  cvusummercamp@cvsdvt.org, with any questions. 

For ALL CVU Students:

There are FREE summer course offerings that will be hosted by CVU over the summer! YOU can receive CVU credit for the completion of the following courses! Some of the many courses range from Writing Prose and Creative Writing to Public Speaking and Anatomy & Physiology to The Oceans and You, among others. Students are able to earn CVU credit for completion of the course, with many earning up to .5 for the subject area. Dates and times vary from course to course, but you can find all of the courses and more information HERE and fill out THIS ONLINE FORM if you are interested. Email Monica Carter for additional information, mcarter@cvsdvt.org.

For ALL CVU Students:

Interested in an interest based workshop this summer? CVU is hosting many workshops for students looking to keep busy over the summer! Workshops range from Computer Programming to Abenaki Culture and Heritage to Paint and Poetry to a Vermont Adventure Week and many more, all free of charge! You cannot earn CVU credit for these courses, but it is a great way to connect with peers, teachers and staff, explore interest- based fields and have fun after such a long, isolated past year. You can find all of the workshops listed here (scroll down to the CVU Workshops) HERE and fill out THIS ONLINE FORM if you are interested in any of the workshops. Contact Monica Carter for any additional information, mcarter@cvsdvt.org.


UVM COURSE OFFERINGS:

Attention CVU Students! You are able to register for UVM Pre-College Courses for the Summer 2021 and the Fall 2021. Most courses are fully-online, but courses like Chemistry will be taught from a Hybrid Learning approach. You are able to receive college credit for the completion of these courses. Additional information can be found HERE and please don’t hesitate to contact your House Counselor about any additional information. 

 

 SUMMER JOBS

*These are some local businesses that are looking to hire potential employees. Age limitations, work experience, job positions needs, etc at specific locations might vary from business to business. Contact businesses directly for any questions and concerns. 

“Part-2″ WORK WITH KIDS

In need of a Summer job? Like working with children?  Part-2 is the perfect place for you! Part-2 is hiring teens like you for preschool and school-aged summer camp positions, at their 8 locations around Chittenden County, such as Shelburne, Williston (Allen Brook School), Montpelier, Richmond, among others. You can apply HERE and Inquire within their website, http://www.parttwokids.com/home.html for additional information. 

 

SWEET ROOTS FARMS (formerly Charlotte Berry)-CHARLOTTE

Need a summer job? Former Charlotte Berry Farm, located just off of Route 7 in Charlotte, newly named Sweet Roots Farms is hiring for summer positions for 2021! Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, creemees, baked goods and more, Sweet Roots is a great place for a hard-working, berry- lover! Please email sweetrootsfarmers@gmail.com for more information.

 

CUCINA ANTICA- SHELBURNE 

Delicious pizza, salads, calzones, pasta and more, right in the heart of the Shelburne Village! Located just across from the Shelburne Supermarket and right next to Aubuchon Hardware, Cucina Antica offers delicious Italian Cuisine. They are hiring now for positions including Servers, Counter/Phones, Dish, Kitchen. Some experience is preferred, but not necessary. APPLY NOW AT https://www.bistrocucinaantica.com/form-job-application.

 

AGAVE- WILLISTON

Located in the Maple Tree Place in Williston, Agave is a delicious Mexican restaurant specializing in Mexican-inspired food and drinks! They are short on staff and looking for students like you to join their team. Inquire on their website via the Contact Form, https://www.agavevt.com/form-contact-us for job opportunities. 

 

HEALTHY LIVING- WILLISTON

As of September 24th, 2021, the Williston Healthy Living was officially opened and ready for business! They are looking to hire passionate and hard-working people to join their team, through paid positions such as Dishwashing, Cashier, among others. Visit https://recruiting.paylocity.com/Recruiting/Jobs/All/f6749321-6721-467b-9755-be942a498f22/ROAD-TO-HANA-INC for more information or inquire within at 129 Market St. Williston, VT 05495.

 

TRADER JOE’S- SOUTH BURLINGTON

Trader Joe’s is looking for passionate, hard-working and welcoming employees to join their business in helping to create a warm and friendly shopping experience, as members of their “Crew” team. Duties include Working on teams to accomplish goals, Operating the cash register in a fun and efficient manner, Bagging groceries with care, Stocking shelves, Creating signage to inform and delight customers, Helping customers find their favorite products, among other things. If you are interested in becoming part of the Trader Joe’s Crew, inquire within the South Burlington location (200 Dorset St, South Burlington, VT 05403) or apply at https://traderjoes.avature.net/careers/ApplicationMethods?jobId=8820. Must be at least 16-years old.

 

LANTMANS- HINESBURG

Lantman’s Market; a locally owned quality market since 1925, located in the heart of Hinesburg is hiring NOW for cashiers, stock floor workers, deli personnel who are “available weekends, evenings and/or daytimes.” Potential employees should be “reliable and enthusiastic to provide friendly customer service to our community” and if this sounds like you, apply today via https://lantmansmarket.com/employment-application.html. Age limitations for some departments range for 18+, but also in need for teen positions. Apply Today!

 

 WAKE ROBIN- SHELBURNE

Wake Robin is a retirement community, located just beyond the Shelburne Museum. They are looking for people who demonstrate strong customer service skills and a desire to work with an active population of seniors, and if this sounds like you, apply today! They are looking for Cooking, Cleaning and Wait Staff among others. Apply at https://www.wakerobin.com/contact-us/employment/ or Inquire within

 

cvu

Sports Update 5/25/21

CVU SPORTS REPORT MAY 25TH

By Erin Fina

Boys Tennis: 

The Boy’s Tennis Team moved to 8-4 on the season while visiting South Burlington on Monday, defeating them. They visit Mt. Mansfield for their last regular season match, Tuesday, May 25th at 3:30pm. 

 

Girls Tennis: 

The Redhawk Girls Tennis team moved to 6-4 this season, but were defeated by South Burlington on Monday, 3-4. CVU Girls Tennis hosts MMU for their senior day and last regular season game on Tuesday, May 25th at Davis Park at 4:30pm. 

 

Girls Lacrosse:

The CVU Girls Varsity Lacrosse team is on a roll, hosting and defeating Burlington 17-5 on Monday, on their Senior Day. They visit South Burlington on Thursday for a BIG rematch under the lights at Munson Field (S. Burlington Turf) at 7pm. 

 

Boys Lacrosse:

The Boys Lacrosse team has an impressive, 12-0 undefeated record thus far in the 2021 regular season. They defeated South Burlington last Friday, 18-11. They host Woodstock on Tuesday at CVU at 4:30pm. 

 

Girls Ultimate:

The Varsity Girl’s Ultimate Frisbee team is 3-6 thus far in the 2021 regular season as of May 18th. They look to host  St. Johnsbury at CVU at 4:30pm on Tuesday.

 

Boys Ultimate:

The Boy’s Varsity Ultimate Team has had an impressive 2021 season, with a 8-2 record. They defeated Colchester last Saturday, 15-6 and this Tuesday (May 25th)  look to visit South Burlington at 7pm for an under the lights game.

 

Baseball: 

The Varsity Boys Baseball Team had themselves a season thus far, going 12-3 thus far. They were defeated by Rice on Saturday, May 22nd 0-1, but look to host St. Johnsbury on Tuesday at 4:30pm.

 

Softball:

The Varsity Softball Team went 2-13 this season and defeated the MMU Cougars last Thursday, 15-3. Their game vs St Johnsbury on Tuesday, May 25th has been cancelled, awaiting information about rescheduling. They do look forward to visiting Burlington on Thursday for a rematch, 4:30pm at Leddy Park. 

Bitcoin_

Bye-Bye Bitcoin…Hello Again?

Bitcoin Stocks Plummeting

Hailey Chase

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE— On April 17, 2021, people involved with the Bitcoin stock market were sent to a frenzy when the market experienced an immense drop, as the Treasury Department was honing in on cryptocurrency as an outlet for money laundering, and a $16 billion change of ownership of Dogecoin occurred via RobinHood. 

The “inevitable” decline, beginning at 7:00pm on Saturday, April 17, was Bitcoin’s largest monetary drop in history—yet it was not the highest percentage drop. In the month of April, the highest recorded price per Bitcoin was over $64,000, and in a short nine days, that price had dropped to under $48,000 by April 25th. The $16,000 drop in price per Bitcoin brought the entire market to a panic and many people sold their shares in fear of an even further decline.

On May 10, 2021, the price per Bitcoin continued to fluctuate by the second, yet the market was steadily recovering. From mid-April to early May, the decay had leveled to only about a 4.5% decrease, and the prices for the past week have only declined .60%.

However, on May 12, Tesla Co-founder and CEO, Elon Musk announced that Tesla will no longer accept Bicoin as a viable form of currency to pay for any Tesla products. At the time of the announcement, Bitcoin was around $56,000, then it took a steep decline of nearly 25% and is hovering around $43,000 as of May 17, 2021.

What does this mean for the future of Bitcoin? Like any cryptocurrency, the market is fast-paced and has the potential to change significantly every day. However, Tesla pulling out of Bitcoin is a major change that the market may not be able to sustain. While some say this crash was to be expected, others say that an even larger price per Bitcoin can be expected in the future. 

vote

Get to Know Your CVU Student Body Co-President Candidates!

By: Katrina Kajenski, Tues, May 18th, 2021

Hinesburg- The CVU student body co-presidential election is happening now. Candidates have being working on a variety of mediums to get there word out about how they will help CVU. Voting will begin at 9:00am Tuesday, May 18th via an emailed google survey and will close at noon on Friday, May 21st. As of now the co-president candidates are Jack Averill and Oliver Pudvar, Chloe Stidsen and Olivia St. Peter, Aidan Devine and Fritz Wetzell and Sabina Brochu and Sophia Stevens. 

On Monday, May 17th I interviewed all of the candidates about the election, starting off with Jack Averill and Oliver Pudvar. The Averill Pudvar team have been planning their candidacy since May of last year and are super excited to work to help CVU. When asked about how they would lead CVU, they said, “We think we would be good leaders for CVU because we both see issues at CVU we believe we can help eliminate to make CVU inclusive for everyone.” When asked about their plans for CVU they shared “ Our plans for next school year are to bring CVU back to life. What we mean by that is bringing events back to CVU as well as adding events, encouraging school spirit to sporting events, theatrical performances, and art shows. We also want to make these inclusive for everyone, so we want to use multiple spaces at events to attract more than just one group of people. We also realize that students really like going out to lunch, and with the amount of support that has brought to local businesses, we want to keep that as an option for students.” Lastly they wanted to share that “a vote for us is a vote for CVYOU!” 

Next I spoke to Aidan Devine and Fritz Wetzell. They are mainly focused on restoring CVU’s sense of community and school spirit. When asked about why they choose to run they said, “We both decided to run for this leadership position because we feel we as a team we are the best choice for representing CVU. With great community outreach through our involvement in many clubs and varsity sports and our experience with leadership we feel are well equipped to handle any challenges the upcoming school year might pose.” When asked about what their plans are for the CVU 2021-2022 School year they shared “In the 2021-2022 school year we will be bringing back school spirit events like never before. The challenges of this past year inspired some great problem solving in our public events like prom, 9th and 10th grade celebrations, and current planning on end of the year celebrations. We want to carry these new ideas forward while still holding on to many of the traditions we all love”. They are both are very excited to start to help CVU.

Next I talked to Chloe and Olivia. They met each other in 6th grade and are ready to represent CVU. When asked about their plans for CVU, they said, “Our plans are to increase environmental awareness by organizing a tree plant-a-thon. We have already been in contact with an organization that can supply us with free seedlings to plant and guidance on how to pull off a tree planting. We understand that not everyone will want to get involved with this, so we will also create a digital day. This just allows time to reflect on how much paper we really use.” This is just one of their many ideas to help the CVU environment. When asked about CVU and how they will help they said,  “We feel CVU is at a turning point. We are transitioning from hybrid back into somewhat of normalcy next year. It is a great time to improve CVU. We think CVU is a great place, there are just some aspects that we’d like to make better. However CVU has to want to grow and improve to do that. Your vote is how you can show your support for our vision. We want everyone at CVU, not just ENACT to understand the problems facing our environment. We want CVU to be a place where different points of view are heard and celebrated, where everyone feels safe. We need your help to get there.”

Lastly, I talked to Sabina Brochu and Sophia Stevens. Sabina was the captain of the co-op Cougarhawks girls varsity hockey team this winter and Sophia is the captain of the Varsity Softball team. They both met freshman year in Nichols core. When asked about how they would lead CVU, they shared, “We both are involved and enjoy being members of the CVU community. We also have contrasting personalities that help us to provide a cohesive and productive leadership style. While working together on the campaign Sabina has brought very elaborate and over the top ideas to the platform and Sophia has helped to make them more realistic and include lost of important deals that Sabina would originally have over looked, that’s really being a uniqueness to our platform and ideas.” When asked about what they would do for CVU, they said, “We plan to bring back redhawk pride and make cvu a place where everyone is excited to come to school and a place where everyone feels included and heard.” 

CVU has got some great candidates, so go out and vote CVU. Voting should be in your email!

 

welcome-to-vermont

How does CVU Feel About Governor Scott’s Three-step Plan?

By Georgia Bruneau, Mon, May 10th, 2021

HINESBURG- With now three effective vaccines and nearly 50% of Vermont’s population vaccinated, we can construct goals and a plan to bring back “normal” life.  Governor Phill Scott has come together with a three-step plan.  The first part of the plan started April 9th; this includes ending travel quarantine requirements, and instead replacing them with testing unvaccinated individuals in less than three days of returning to Vermont. Step two of this plan starts in May and involves increasing the number of people in gatherings inside and outside. The third and final part of the plan is lifting the mask mandate on July 4th. “We’re in the last laps of this race and this plan shows how we can finish strong if we all do our part,” said Governor Scott. 

However, some Vermont residents have worries and concerns about this “good news.” “I would like to have current data on how often the disease is spread while people are still vaccinated,” said CVU math teacher Hannah Carey. Carey also says “If we can have gatherings of 150 inside, non-spaced, and no masks by July 4th, why do I have to wear a mask in a classroom with 27 other kids next year? Where’s the logic here? If you’re suggesting I wear a mask in the fall in my classroom to prevent getting Covid, then why is okay for other people to attend a 150 person wedding inside without being spaced, and you’re eating? How is that all going to work?” 

But teachers aren’t the only ones who have an opinion on the matter. A student from CVU speaks on behalf of the student body about the news: “I feel really excited about the fact that masks could possibly be gone in the near future. If the plan is truly effective it would be an amazing weight lifted off of many people’s shoulders. I think that we are partially on the right track. I think many people have good intentions and the vaccine is a great step in the right direction but many people are getting more relaxed about covid. I don’t have many worries about people not wearing masks by July 4th if everyone sticks to the guidelines; my only worry would be that we push it too fast and we begin to see a spike in cases and then we have to take more steps backward,” says sophomore Anna Morton.

Overall the CVU community is ecstatic about the Governor’s plan for normalcy, but we still seem to be slightly skeptical of the idea. Is it illogical like Carey said? Or a step in the right direction as Morton believes?