Perspectives on Confederate Monuments from AP Gov Students

Ms. Emma Rosenau

Dear Editor,

Three weeks ago, all across the country people watched as white supremacists and neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville, Virginia and clashed with counter protesters. The violence came to a head when a man drove his car into the crowd of people, killing one woman and injuring many others. This disturbing event has since launched a national conversation about what fueled the protests and why a monument to Confederate general Robert E. Lee, which was slated to be taken down from its pedestal because of the racism and division the Confederacy represents, was such a “hot-topic” issue. These tributes to Confederate leaders are all over the South. They are in public places, funded by taxpayers, and increasingly controversial. We are now faced with a tough decision: what do we do with them?

Editorial cartoon by Brenna

Editorial cartoon by Brenna Comeau

 

Many Southerners view the subjects of such statues as heroes of the “lost cause of the Confederacy”, for their ancestorsseen as valiant warriors were only defending what they thought was right. This romantic idea of people like Robert E. Lee is deeply embedded in Southern society.  

Others view the statues as historical, arguing that all they do is commemorate important figures from the Civil War; yes, that war may have been to protect a system of slavery, and what they fought for may have left a legacy of racial injustice continuing into the present day, but removing a monument or two won’t change the past. History is history, and we have to remember it and learn from it…  but these monuments are not history. Not even close.

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Bear Season Loads up on Berries, Goes into Hibernation

Mr. Samuel Comai

CHARLOTTE, VT– Friday, September 8th marks the first day of bear hunting season in Vermont. Local hunters are shining their guns and stocking up on bullets for the season which will last until mid-October.

Bear season is split into two consecutive hunting opportunities. The first season, which lasts from September 8th to October 10th, requires a special tag to hunt. The second season, known as the “late season, is shorter, lasting one week from October 11th to October 18th.

“One black bear per square mile is the current population in Vermont, this is an incredibly high number that ranks among the highest populations in the country,” states VT bear biologist, Forrest Hammond.

Those statistics have created a surge of excitement among hunters all across the state. The 2016 season resulted in 697 bear kills. People may look at these numbers and be disgusted by the heavy removal of black bears. However, hunting is heavily regulated by the state, making it illegal to kill more than one bear a season and, according to Hammond, many hunters say it is incredibly beneficial to a controlled growth in the bear population.

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