Editorial: CVU Kids Need to Represent & Respect When Out in the Community

Ms. Sofia Dattilio

“Take care of yourself. Take care of each other. Take care of this place.” This is the mission that the CVU community strives toward. But what happens when we step into the community outside of CVU? Do these rules still apply? Do we remember who we are? Do we remember where we come from?

When CVU students step into the community not too far outside of CVU such as Jiffy Mart, Paisley Hippo, or Papa Nicks we need to be aware of how we represent our school, the greater community and family. We are CVU. We want to show the community we are respectful and that we care about those around us. We need to think about how our actions may affect others.

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Image courtesy of Jiffy Mart Stores

Imagine you’re working behind a cash register and a large group of teenagers come into your place of work. In a larger group, they are loud, they throw money down on the counter towards you, and they don’t say “thank you.” Quite disrespectful, right? Is this really what we want to show the community about who we are as CVU? All of these disrespectful actions happen right here in the town of Hinesburg.

Local businesses see how, when in large groups, students end up disrupting the community and engage in rude behaviours. Briana Dattilio, a 25 year old cashier at Jiffy Mart, says, “When they get into large groups, that is when they begin to be rude and hold up the line by talking and not respecting others who are in line by cutting them to be with their friends.” She goes on to explain that she automatically notices the actions of the CVU students and is often annoyed by the way CVU students make Jiffy Mart employees and other patrons feel.

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Rosalind Franklin & Nicole Gorman, Unsung Heroes in Science

Ms. Sarah Clauss, CVC Science & Environmental Correspondent

When most people think of famous scientists, they think of Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, or Isaac Newton. While these are three important contributors to our body of scientific knowledge, it’s not a particularly diverse group. While the field of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) was once dominated by white men, we owe our current understanding to men and women from all nationalities, ethnicities, and origins.

Nicole Gorman teaches AP Biology at Champlain Valley Union HS. Despite the quick pace of lessons and massive amount of content that she covers, Ms. Gorman always takes time during the unit on genetics to discuss Rosalind Franklin, the woman whose chromographs of genetic material — shared by a colleague, without Franklin’s knowledge or permission — led to Watson and Crick’s double helix model of DNA.

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Rosalind Franklin, The Mother of DNA

 

Although Franklin’s work allowed Cambridge University geneticists James Watson and Francis Crick to accurately model DNA, she did not receive a Nobel Prize. Franklin died at age 37, likely a result of exposure to X-ray radiation in the line of her research.

Ms. Gorman teaches this lesson for several reasons. First, she says, “I like to talk about the scientists that contributed to our understanding/helped to explain a variety of foundational concepts… One compelling reason to point this out is to encourage students themselves to ask, discover and explain.” She also thinks that it is an important lesson in collaboration; too many young scientists think that working together is not necessary. Lastly, Gorman takes this opportunity to talk about taking credit for the work of others. “The story of Rosalind Franklin is an interesting story about how this can and does happen,” she says.

Ms. Gorman also discussed why she thinks that it’s important for students to have a diverse set of academic role models. According to her, “role models are a source of inspiration. Inspiration from many different sources ensures that you can continue to be inspired as you grow and change over time.”

In addition, she claims that having a role model that a student can identify with allows them to imagine themselves making the same choices and moving in similar directions to that person. She says, “If your role model is someone you want to be, then this desire will drive the choices you make….even if they are difficult choices. The power of thinking you are similar to someone or want to be like someone is an excellent driver of engagement, [which] drives progress.”

Rosalind Franklin is just one of many inspiring scientists in her field. But in CVU’s AP Biology classroom, her story is inspiring the scientists of a new generation.

 

Coping with Stress and Anxiety: You Are Not Alone

Ms. Greta Powers, Reporter-at-Large

With finals just around the corner, there is a lot of stress to be found at high schools everywhere, and CVU is no exception. Although students are salivating at the sweet realization that the school year is almost over, there can still be anxiety about final grades, schedules, and the future. This stress can quickly become overwhelming. It’s not just high school students who are feeling the pressure; parents can get caught up in stress about their children’s tests and futures, too. Not to fear though because there are specialists on just this problem that students and parents alike are facing these days.

Lynn Lyons is a nationally known expert on anxiety. She has written three books detailing how to cope with anxiety for parents and children, and has appeared on NPR, in The New York Times, and on Katie Couric’s morning show. More and more high school students are suffering from anxiety, and Lyons teaches how the large, heavy mass that is stress can be relieved.

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Author and therapist Lynn Lyons and one of her books

Lyons provided a view into why high school students are more anxious than ever. “I think it’s that this generation of parents are the post 9/11 generation and one of the things that makes children more anxious is when parents perceive the world as a dangerous place,” she states. “Since 9/11 there has been a lot more talk about danger of the world, danger about childhood, danger about adolescence, and danger of becoming of an adult,” she continues. This, of course, is true. The world can seem like an awfully dangerous place, and when parents reinforce this perilous perspective on their children, an already scary world can seem downright nightmarish.

A unique attribute of “Gen-Z” is the abundance of technology at teenagers’ fingertips. Technology at one’s demand means news, data, and facts at one’s demand, also. “Anxiety demands certainty, and with technology and social media there is this weird dichotomy of believing you can know everything ahead of time and at the same time getting too much information that is really hard to process.” Today’s teenagers are a generation in the midst of school shootings, and a confusing, controversial political environment where any sort of certainty is less achievable than ever. With heartbreaking tragedies popping up on the news frequently, it’s easy for one’s mind to be uncertain whether they are safe or not. Anxiety can creep into a constant restlessness that can translate into a lot of worries about one’s state of being.

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Maintenance Crew Gives CVU Sports Fields TLC

Ms. Sofia Dattilio

When fall and spring sports start to approach, the maintenance crew, made up of Nate Miner, Paul Hadd, Dylan Raymond and Tom Mungeon, has a big responsibility of preparing the fields for all of the games that will be played. This takes approximately half a day to accomplish.

Dan Shepardson, Director of Student Activities says, “They work 6am-3pm, so they can’t work on fields after games because it would be considered over time.”

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Paul Hadd puts the finishing touches on the lax pitch. Image by CVC staff.

Mowing, weed-eating, applying topsoil, seeding and aerating the soil are all components that go into making sure the fields are ready to go for game time. This ends up being very labor intensive for the maintenance crew.

Shepardson says, “At the beginning of the sports season, it takes longer to prepare the fields because you have to draw in the lines, but after that, it doesn’t take much to run the painter down the lines.” On average, maintenance will draw in lines twice a week.

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CVU Sorting Stations Cause Confusion, which is Confusing

Ms. Sarah Clauss, CVC Environmental Correspondent

In 2013, CVU installed sorting stations in the cafeteria to separate trash, recycling, and compost. They were designed by students in EnACT (Environmental Action Club). Although all of the students currently at CVU have been using the stations since they started here, problems with sorting remain.

Grace Hemmelgarn and Tess Cloutier, the EnACT members leading the project to improve the stations and educate people about proper use, had some insights about why students have trouble knowing where to put their garbage. According to Hemmelgarn, “common mistakes include chip bags, brown salad boats, [and] wax paper.” Many of the items that confuse students come from food packaged by the cafeteria. For example, the salad containers are made from plant-based plastic, which is compostable. Since they look like typical plastic containers, however, they are often found in the recycling bin. Similarly, wax paper, which also belongs in the compost, often ends up in the trash. When a ‘batch’ of recycling or compost has an item that does not belong, the whole container is thrown away. In this way, more material ends up in landfills instead of where it belongs.

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Really, how hard can it be, people?

Since the installation of the sorting stations, EnACT has done several projects directed to improve sorting accuracy. EnACT members have conducted several “trash audits”, where students sorted waste pulled from the landfill and recycling bins to figure out commonly misplaced items. Posters were put up around the school with pictures of these items and their proper places in the stations.

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Sophomore Engage Day Offers Exercise in Activism

Ms. Alyssa Gorton

In today’s political climate, it can be difficult choosing who and what to believe. Even more difficult is standing up for your own personal convictions in a way that is peaceful, respectful, and powerful. As a 14-17 year old in Vermont, it may seem like there is little to do or to be done due to the voting age. With passion, however, there is always work to be done, especially if you have an affinity for a governmental profession. CVU’s Engage Day is an amazing opportunity to let students get involved in what they’re spirited about, and make connections within the community.

For many students, including myself, social activism is important, seeing as the environment we’ve been forced into is one of ceaseless media coverage, dividing politicians, and up until recently, the silencing of the youth. One of CVU’s workshops titled Social Activism, sparked the interest of both me and many of my friends. No matter what political party you identify with (if any), it’s easy to see that we’re in a time of division and strong opinions, but knowing how you can make a difference in your community is without a doubt empowering to you and those around you.

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Image courtesy of Alyssa Gorton

The workshop was, without a doubt, run extremely well. That was mostly due to the charisma and kind nature of the selectboard candidate Rebecca (Becca) White, who composed the workshop and interacted with those in the group in a way that was genuine and educational. One of the first things we did as a group was discuss issues that were important to us and put them up on the whiteboard to get a general feel of the room.

engage day

Most people in this room came prepared with a variety of questions to ask about how to get involved in their community. While there are already many ways to get involved at CVU through school clubs and opportunities, some students would either like to seek a more individual approach to activism, or just go above and beyond with their community involvement.

A club new to the CVU scene, Student Justice Committee (SJC), was made with the intention to allow and commit students to seek out and change that which they deem unjust, unfair, or inane. The founders, Sydney Hicks and Asha Hickok, who also helped organize our walkout, stated that their intentions lie within “further pursuing actions based around activism, and inviting students to discuss politics in an open and safe environment,” which is a prime example of the student leadership culture founded within the walls of CVU.

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Students Sleep Out for a Cause

Ms. Elyse Martin-Smith

Have you ever imagined what it would be like if you didn’t have a home? If you didn’t have a family or a place to sleep? If you didn’t have the device you are reading this on at this very moment? Many people around the world are deprived of these simple opportunities that we take for granted. However, sometimes it is enlightening to forgo these privileges and live without them, so that we can be more empathetic to those who actually don’t have them.

The Spectrum Sleep Out was a great way to experience this in an organized manner. Spectrum is an organization that works to prevent homelessness for young adults and youth in Vermont. They have had multiple sleepouts, with some for adults, like in Burlington. This year was the first year that CVU participated in the Spectrum Sleep Out as a school.

Mia Brumstead was a leader in organizing this event at CVU. This occurred on Thursday, April 5th, at the CVU grounds from eight at night to eight in the morning. The Spectrum Sleep Out was an event where roughly 40 kids and teachers slept with tents or without tents in the 20 degree weather overnight. The purpose of the sleep out was to raise awareness and to fundraise for Spectrum, with the end goal of eventually preventing homelessness around the country.

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Mia Brumsted, a CVU sophomore, gave me some information on how she organized this event. “In the beginning of the year Mark Reidman, who’s the executive director of Spectrum came to CVU… We just started talking about how CVU has never done one before and I think that really struck me… so I thought it’s only fitting that we do one at CVU because of how inclusive our community is.”

When asked about her favorite part of the night she said, “when Mark came and brought Kathleen, who was at one point in her life homeless… but her life was completely turned around because of Spectrum, and I think listening to her talk to everyone at the Sleep Out was very meaningful and super informative.” For me, the largest takeaway from the night was also hearing Kathleen’s first hand experience. Mia then added, “I hope that even after I leave CVU that this will be a tradition… and I hope that as a community we can be more aware of the homeless community and the problems they face every day.”

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One-Act Wonders Showcase Student Directors

Ms. Greta Powers, CVC Arts Correspondent

The CVU Theatre Program’s spring performance this year was comprised of the One-Acts, a series of four short plays. The plays featured were Attack of the Moral Fuzzies, Death, 13 Ways to Screw Up Your College Interview, and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. As usual, the spring performance rotates between a full-length play and the One-Acts each year. Since last year’s spring performance was the show, Get Smart, it was time for the students to step up this year and have a go at a new experience. This is the second performance of school year with the first being the fall musical, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. The biggest difference between the One-Acts, the fall musical, and even last year’s play is that the One-Acts were student directed.

CVU Student Directors

Photo courtesy of CVU Theatre

Instead of an adult leading a group of high school students, four experienced CVU seniors lead their peers to create the production. Brenna Comeau, Weller Henderson, Alexa Kartschoke, and Halina Vercessi-Clarke were certainly up to the task of individually directing the short plays. What was possibly the most unexpected, though, was what these four directors would experience during their time as directors.

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School Resource Officer Anthony Cambridge Builds Bridges

Mr. Logan Jipner

HINESBURG, VT – Word of a new police presence at CVU has been floating around the school community, lately. People are seeing police more often at school and are curious as to why Anthony Cambridge, CVU’s Student Resource Officer, has been making more regular appearances on school grounds lately.

Officer Cambridge stated, “I’ve actually been there more in the past year compared to the  previous years. I’ve been there more than I’d like to be.”

Cambridge comes to CVU for a variety of reasons. “It’s always something different. Sometimes it’s something stolen, an accident at or near CVU, weapons or drugs or cigarettes (violations of school policy).” In addition he says, “I go to CVU to talk about things that are going on to prevent incidents from occurring.” Cambridge comes to school when he is called to deal with policy violations, but in his current position, he also works alongside students, faculty and the school board on initiatives and training that are meant to be preventative safety measures.

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Anthony Cambridge tests out a new infrared digital thermometer. Photo courtesy of the Citizen.

At first, Officer Cambridge says he didn’t want to be the SRO for CVU. “…my relationship with the school used to be bad, but I should be familiar with the school.” Cambridge expresses that when cops are only seen as punishers, it makes it difficult to build relationships. However, when students learn to appreciate police for all they do to create a safe community, positive relationships between students and local police can become the norm.  

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Track & Field Program Sees Changes, Still Charges Ahead

Ms. Joyce Ke, CVC Correspondent

With Spring just starting, CVU is getting ready for another year of Track and Field. There are many new changes coming our way. The CVU Track and Field program has officially changed and added to the season this year with new head coaches, event captains, and rules. Another topic of interest is the weather that we have been experiencing this year. The snow that we got this past winter left the Track covered late into April, which causes the team to have to practice inside the gym. The good news is that the track was plowed early and is almost always available but. The field, however, took much longer to dry out.


This year the Track and Field coaches have announced that Scott Bliss, who is the distance and high jump coach and former head coach, has stepped down. Scott is also the coach for Cross Country which takes place in the Fall. In his place is Jessica LaPlante and King Milne are acting co-head coaches this season. Along with being a co-head coach, LaPlante is also the throwing coach and the Jv Field Hockey Coach in the Fall, and Milne is also the hurdles coach and the Nordic coach which takes place in the Winter. 

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Club Stalwarts: FBLA Manages Statewide Presence

Mr. Ethan Duncan

Future Business Leaders of America, or FBLA, is a “career and technical student organization, with a focus on business education,” according to Vermont FBLA Treasurer and CVU FBLA President Preston Webb. “What we try to do at CVU is enhance everybody’s business skills through a number of activities… it’s this cool relationship between community service, leadership activities, and collaborative activities.”

Noah Lemieux, Vermont FBLA Vice President and CVU FBLA member, added“If you are at all interested in going into business, or even just having a job, FBLA is a great thing to be a part of.”

 

“As a local officer, being president of CVU FBLA, I help facilitate our meetings, create agendas, try to make it entertaining and try to get stuff done. We’ll do stuff like business trivia and different games as well,” says Webb.

FBLA Final

Image thanks to the Fantastic Ms. (Carol) Fox

Webb is the president of CVU’s chapter, but several other officer positions are available besides president. Local officers help the chapter run its services in and out of school. These positions include vice president, secretary, treasurer, parliamentarian, and more. Members of FBLA are allowed to run for local office and help their local chapter, but also have a chance to participate at the state level through elections at the Vermont State FBLA conferences. Noah Lemieux was elected the 2018 Northern Vice President of Vermont’s FBLA chapter.

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Burlington High School Becomes the Second Vermont High School to Raise The Black Lives Matter Flag

Ms. Shea Stirewalt

BURLINGTON,VT- Burlington High School raised the Black Lives Matter flag on Monday, February 19, 2018. Burlington High School is the second high school in Vermont to raise the Black Lives Matter flag, with Montpelier High School being the first to raise the flag. CVU has yet to raise the Black Lives Matter flag.

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 Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an international activist movement. This movement campaigns against violence and racism towards black people. In 2014, the American Dialect Society chose #BlackLivesMatter as their word of the year, and the Black Lives Matter campaign began spreading as a popular campaign.

Montpelier High School was the first of the Vermont high schools to raise the flag on Thursday, February 1, 2018, attracting national attention. Now the word is spreading and students at both Burlington and Montpelier HIgh School hope that other high schools will follow their lead.

According to the Burlington Free Press, many students at Burlington High School are hoping that this statement their high school is making by raising the flag, will help spur a national movement.

 

 

Environmentalism in the Kitchen: How a Plant-Based Diet Can Reduce Emissions… and be Delicious

Ms. Sarah Clauss, CVC Environmental Correspondent

When they think of emissions, most people think of cars and trucks and things that go. But our diet can have a huge effect on our carbon footprint. Livestock and their byproducts account for 51 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to the World Watch Institute. Essentially, the meat-lovers pizza you order might cost you more carbon than your ride home after.

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What can we do? I discussed environmental food choices with CVU student Ali Drew, who decided to cut all animal products out of her diet after watching a speech by vegan activist Gary Yourofsky. The main points addressed by Yourofsky included the environmental impacts and the ethics of consuming meat and other animal products. (His speech can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5hGQDLprA8&vl=en.) Drew says that it was difficult trying to replace foods, but she realized that it would be easier to find new vegan foods. A diet without animal products also reduces the amount of processed foods consumed, another benefit for environmentalists trying to change their habits. 

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Student-led Walkout Honors Parkland Victims, Advocates for Change

Mr. Scott A. Stanley

HINESBURG, VT — The recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida left the entire country in a state of shock and dismay. School shootings seem to have become more and more frequent since Columbine in 1999, and little has been done to prevent them. On the 14th of March, schools nationwide held walkouts to bring awareness to these atrocities and to push for change. The US Congress’ inability to institute new laws to protect school children have left many frustrated and demanding change. 

Because of a Nor’easter that shut down schools across Vermont, CVU Principal Adam Bunting moved the planned student action to Friday, March 16th. An estimated 600 students and faculty gathered at the entrance to the school.

While there were many people who both supported and opposed the walkout, Principal Adam Bunting decided to allow it. “We did it first obviously to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting, two, to encourage student advocacy, whether it’s one way or another.”

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Learn by Doing At Area Tech Centers

Ms. Makayla Driscoll

Champlain Valley Union High School hosted representatives from Burlington Technical Center and the Center for Technology, Essex on Thursday, February 8th to provide a brief overview of each program the schools offer. Both CTE and BTC provide technical programs based on challenging the comprehension of students 16 years and older, according to Vermont Adult Career and Technical Education Association.

Schools such as CVU, South Burlington High School, Colchester High School, and Essex High School allow students grades 10+ to apply for a program of their choice at either CTE or BTC to further their education in a specific field.  

According to Marie Eddy, one of CVU’s guidance counselor, CTE provides students with programs such as Automotive Technology, Building Technology and Systems, Childhood Education/ Human Services, Computer Animations & Web Design, Computer Systems Technology, Cosmetology, Dental Assisting, Design & Creative Media, Engineering & Architectural Design, Health Informatics, Natural Resources-Forestry and Mechanical, and Professional Foods.

Image courtesy of Big Heavy World

Image courtesy of Big Heavy World

 

Can’t find what you’re looking for at CTE? BTC provides Auto Body Repair, Automotive Science & Tech, Aviation & Aerospace Tech, Computer Systems & Emerging Technologies, Criminal Justice, Culinary Arts, Design & Illustration, Digital Media Lab, Human Services, Medical & Sports Sciences, Programming & Computer Science, and Welding/ Metal Fabrication programs. Between the two centers, everyone is bound to find a program that they’ll enjoy! 

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Scholars Bowl Teams Put a Serious (Intellectual) Smackdown on the Competition

Mr. Henry Caswell, CVC Campus Correspondent

When you think of Champlain Valley Union High School, what usually pops into your head is usually the athletics, the large student body, the strong community, and the wide variety of classes that our available to students. What you might not think of are the clubs, in particular the Scholars Bowl team.  Scholars Bowl is a competition involving questions and answer games where speedy answers are the key to winning.

This year’s team has been the most successful CVU Scholars Bowl team since 2011, according to John Bennett, the CVU Scholars Bowl coach. “We won the novice bracket at the PHAT tournament in December, the JV A and B state championships, the VT NAQT championship on March 9, and finished at least in the final 4 for the 9th time in the past 12 seasons.  Our quarterfinal win over Burlington is already being considered one of the most exciting matches ever. We beat all the other top contenders in the league this season at one time or another and played well in our semi-final loss to Hanover”, Bennet said.  

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Henry Wilson, Thomas Daley, Sam Gelin, Nate Hodgson-Walker, Cooper Birdsall, Zach Loiter, Mark Lang, Andrew Silverman, Mathew Silverman, Evan Beal, Bay Foley Cox, Peter Antinozzi, Milo Cress, Gabe Atkins, Ben Gramling, Isaac Krementsov, Sam Lawrence, Jake Tworog, and Patton Wager are all part of the team that is divided into smaller teams starting with the A team and ending at the F team.

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Snow Daze: Who Makes the Call and How?

Mr. Henry Caswell, CVC Special Ops

Every student at CVU will tell you that call at 6:00 in the morning noting that school has been cancelled is the best feeling ever. Living in Vermont, where snow is very prominent in the winter, students can expect around two or three snow days a year. But students usually never know if they’ll actually have a snow day until the next morning. Educating students and teachers on the factors that our administration takes consideration is important so we know the real chances of a snow day. In addition, it’s important to know who makes those decisions for Champlain Valley Union High School so we know who to hold accountable.

Jeanne Jensen, the COO of the Champlain Valley School District, talked about who makes the decisions around snow days and what factors they look when making the call. Jensen noted that it is the role of the superintendent to cancel school.

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Snow Day Calculator, Magic Eight Ball, or Jean Jensen? What do you rely on to plan your snow day?

When asked what factors are considered, Jensen said the following. “The factors that go into the decision are  the weather forecast from the National Weather Service, and the road conditions from the local town road commissioners – specifically whether or not they have been able (or think they will be able) to make the roads safe for travel.”

 Jensen also mentioned that it is easier to make a decision when the storm has ended overnight or is ending early in the morning. In addition, she said that it’s difficult to predict how the roads will be at 3:00 when we have to make a decision at 4:30 AM. “We never want to bring students to school and not be able to get them home,” Jensen added.

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ShredHawks Hang on for More Snow: CVU’s Ski & Snowboard Club Frets about Iffy Conditions

Mr. Ethan Oglesby

HINESBURG- CVU’s Ski and Snowboard Club, The Shredhawks have experienced a slow start to the season due to bad weather, but are hoping this changes soon.

So far this season, the club has only made one after-school trip to Bolton Valley, where in past seasons, it would have made up to four or five by this point in the season.

Image by CarolFoxProductions Inc.

CVU Shredhawks and mascot. Image by CarolFoxProductions Inc.

An avid skier and Shredhawks member, Fiona Love says, “We have gone up once, but after this past thaw, we have been waiting for better conditions. After this upcoming storm, we are heading to Bolton for a day trip this Wednesday.“

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(Big sigh) Climate Change: Not Going Anywhere Anytime Soon

Ms. Elyse Martin-Smith, CVC Culture Correspondent

Could you imagine the devastating effects of having your home destroyed by flooding or a powerful hurricane? Could you imagine constant heat waves, like in Vermont where they are used to skiing the snowy slopes? Could you imagine getting only so much water per person, per day, because your supply is drastically low? If we continue on the path we are on in terms of global warming, this could be our reality in less than fifty years. Many people don’t realise how quickly our futures and the futures of our children will be permanently altered because of climate change. One question we should ask ourselves is: What is going to happen, and how can we fix this?

According to the 2014 National Climate Assessment, “between 1958 and 2010, the Northeast saw more than a 70% increase in the amount of precipitation falling in very heavy events (defined as the heaviest 1% of all daily events).” This battle against climate change hasn’t just begun, but in fact climate change has been a problem for quite a while. Based on this trend, scientists have begun to predict what weather changes may happen in the near future. NASA says that “heat waves, heavy downpours and sea level rise pose growing challenges to many aspects of life in the Northeast. Infrastructure, agriculture, fisheries and ecosystems will be increasingly compromised.” This is the opposite in the Southwest, where they predict increasing numbers of droughts.

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These extreme weather conditions will not only affect humans, but they will also affect other animal species. Near the poles, “the Arctic Ocean is expected to become essentially ice free in summer before mid-century,” according to NASA. Chittenden Core science teacher Andrea Boehmcke proposes that “[the largest consequence for the earth] is going to be rising sea levels and flooding,” which will not only shift the water cycle but also wind patterns. She also explained that there would be severe droughts as well.

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201 Plungers Put Booth’s Mane on the Line, a First-time First-hand Account

 Ms. Elyse Martin-Smith, CVC Roving Reporter

BURLINGTON —  On February 3rd I participated in the Penguin Plunge at the Burlington waterfront for the first time. It was a new experience that was very rewarding in the end.

To begin, we were all standing outside in the freezing cold as we waited for the festivities. Everyone was very cold, but I could never expect how cold we would feel afterwards, which was even worse than I imagined. After we took our team picture, we were separated into different groups in warming tents. Everyone was very excited and nervous at the same time as we got ready to take the icy plunge.

Image courtesy of Gino Johnson

Image courtesy of Gino Johnson

 

The tents were filled with anticipation and excitement radiating almost as much as the heat. Julia Herberg, a CVU freshman and first time plunger shared one of the reasons she was excited to participate. She said, “I am excited for the food.” In fact, plungers received coupons for many places, including Skinny Pancake and David’s Tea. Julia also added that she liked how it brought people together.

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CVU Mathletics Dept: Mathletes Convene for Showdown at U-32

Mr. Milo Cress

Montpelier, VT – The CVU Math League team has returned from their meet at U-32 High School in Montpelier on January 5th after completing a set of tests designed to challenge and enhance their problem-solving and cooperative skills.

Dylan Gooley, a CVU junior and advanced math specialist, was impressed with his team’s performance. “These math competitions are a great environment for like minded, bright individuals to enjoy their passions. Although lacking in a strong presence of veterans, the CVU math team shows a measure of competitive vigor. At today’s meet, one of the Sophomores on the team, named Jake, scored the legendary perfect score on a test”.

Image smuggled by Milo Cress

Image smuggled out by Milo Cress

According to Charlie MacFadyen, the team’s coach, “Math League provides an opportunity for students who enjoy problem-solving and learning additional topics and techniques in math. We meet every Friday morning. On meet days, students spend the bus ride reviewing the topics for the meet. Each student takes three of 4 12-minute tests, in Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra and Advanced Math. Five students then collaborate on a “team test.” For this meet, those students were Gabe Atkins, Jake Twarog, Delaney Brunvand, Karolina Sienko, and Sunny Premsankar.”

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CVU Men’s Basketball Plans for Return to Finals

Mr. Garrett Dunn

Now underway with their 2018-2019 season, the CVU Men’s Basketball team has just four seniors: Joe Warren, and returning captains Paul Keen, Spencer Dooley, and  Will Burroughs. Lead by Head Coach Michael Osborne, the previous Division I finalist team plans on making a return to the championship once more.

While talking with his team before their preseason game against Lamoille Valley, Coach Osborne reminded them that he plans for this team to accomplish great things. “I have big expectations this year for you guys. You’ll all do great things but we gotta work for it, so let’s set the tone tonight for the rest of the season.”

Image from the CVU team Facebook page

Image from the CVU team Facebook page

Like Osborne, many other people want to see the boys’ team succeed this year. Basketball’s biggest fan and CVU senior, Jacob Mintz-Roberts, is very excited to see his friends play on the court, and lead their school to yet another outstanding season. Mintz-Roberts thinks that their competition is on the rise. He hopes fans will come out to cheer on CVU against tough teams, including Rutland, last year’s State Champion, and BHS.

Mintz-Roberts has a lot of faith in some key players this season, like Nikos Carroll. Mintz-Roberts believes that Carroll is going to play a huge role on the team on the court with his everlasting hustle and danger behind the three point line.

CVU senior, basketball team captain, Varsity  Volleyball starter, certified referee,  older brother, and role model Will Burroughs gave us some insight on his thoughts for this year. He described his excitement to see the new and returning talents of Carroll, Ethan Harvey, and Graham Walker, all scoring and getting play time.

Fans are expected to fill the gym this season. Let’s see if this group of boys can bring one home for CVU this year. Best of luck to the boys!

 

A Fresh Look at the Old Winter Ball

Ms. Greta Powers, CVC Culture Correspondent

Two weeks before the Winter Ball, during White day block 3, Chittenden core Personal Health/Project Adventure teacher, TJ Mead, is laying out the rules for a highly anticipated game in Project Adventure.

“The game,” TJ eagerly says, “is called chaos ball.”

“Sounds like another name for Winter Ball,” I quipped. The remark was met by laughter from my classmates and a grin from TJ.

The previous day in Personal Health, the class had discussed different problems that could occur around the time of Winter Ball. It was merely another time out of a thousand someone had uttered the words “Winter Ball” at CVU in three weeks.

Whatever the reason for its popularity, there seems to be a lot of fuss over Winter Ball. My friends bought numerous dresses online to find the right one and to also eliminate the dreaded chance of being stuck with a faulty dress. When one of my male friends asked a girl why she purchased so many dresses, she quickly responded with, “Well, I have to find one that’s good!” as if it were obvious. It wasn’t quite that obvious to the boy.


I too, cynically enough, enjoyed seeing the ups and downs of people asking each other out to the ball. It was as if I were a spectator on the bleachers of a game, but the game was a bunch of 9th graders either being rejected and embarrassed, or accepted and excited. In this game, halftime is a big dose of emotions.

So what’s with all the hoopla about Winter Ball? Though not even the most popular formal dance of the year (Prom takes that prize), it still seems to catch the attention of many CVU students. Perhaps because it concludes the week of midterms and with that pressure gone, it’s a fun way to celebrate. Or maybe Winter Ball provides a sense of comaraderie amongst CVU students; everyone can talk about it because everyone knows about it.

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13th Annual Cafe for a Cause Benefits Richmond Food Shelf

Sr. Enzo Delia

Each year in the heart of December, Cafe for a Cause takes place in the CVU Cafeteria.  Cafe for a Cause is CVU’s way of giving back to surrounding communities in a big way.

 “Cafe for a Cause is a fundraising event that was started about 12-13 years ago, just as a way of raising money for charities and giving back to the community,” says Leo LaForce, who started the event a year after becoming the CVU’s cafeteria owner/manager in 2004.

 “This year’s proceeds are going to a local food shelf; Student council specifically chose the Richmond Food Shelf as there is a tie in with the Richmond Food Shelf and CVU, and there was also an article that rose awareness of the fact that the Richmond Food Shelf is particularly struggling this year, so the money will go to the Richmond Food Shelf, but we’re also asking for food donations, and the food donations will go to the Hinesburg Food Shelf,” explains Leo.

The food options for this year were similar to last year, featuring many students’ favorite items, kicking off with waffles in the morning, made by your very own Student Council reps.

“Usually, every Cafe for a Cause we do one of the most favored items of the students which is the cheese tortellini in the pesto sauce, so we’ll be doing that, alongside another favorite, Pizza from Dominos, and this time in a complete white dough as opposed to the usual half-whole wheat dough, which students tend to prefer [the white dough], in addition, we’ll have all of the other normal items, the burrito bar, the salad bar, panini’s and things like that,” added Leo.

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