CVU’s Premiere Golf Course Gets Some Respect

Mr. Samuel Comai, CVC Leisure Sports Correspondent

The student body seems to be quick to judge the new frisbee golf course behind CVU. Insults from some CVU students have been aggressive and ill-informed. With misinformation circulating, it is important to put the truth of the course at the forefront of this discussion. The extensive surveying, design, and work put into the course do not match the respect it is getting. Carol Fox of the Wellness Committee, puts forward an honest takef about this fantastic resource.

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In the warmer months of the year, it is common to hear kids complain and insult the “frisbee golf” course. “Why would the school waste $20,000 destroying the forest and putting in a course that will never be used?” some of them wonder. “Think about everything else we could use that money for,” others assert. It is quite obvious that a large percent of the student body is unaware of the facts behind The Hawks Nest. The most widely spread misconception is that $20,000 of the school’s budget was used for the course, which in fact is not where the money came from.

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CVU Cafeteria Shakes it Up

Ms. Sofia Dattillio

Hinesburg, VT— On Monday, January 22nd, CVU students saw a change in their cafeteria with the arrangements of booths, tables, and waste bins after they continuously left behind trash, food, and recycling on tables and between the walls and booths.

Prior to the new arrangement, the custodians were spending too much time picking up after students to make sure that the cafeteria was cleaned up and ready to go for the next day.

According to Marilyn Mashia, one of the CVU custodians, “People were stuffing trash and food between the walls, leaving trays on the floor, [and] just leaving a complete mess.”

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Image by Sofia Datilio

This change allows for the campus supervisors, Tim Albertson, Jamie Hayes, and Seth Emerson, to spread out more within the cafeteria to ensure students are picking up after themselves.

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Burlington High School Becomes the Second Vermont High School to Raise The Black Lives Matter Flag

Ms. Shea Stirewalt

BURLINGTON,VT- Burlington High School raised the Black Lives Matter flag on Monday, February 19, 2018. Burlington High School is the second high school in Vermont to raise the Black Lives Matter flag, with Montpelier High School being the first to raise the flag. CVU has yet to raise the Black Lives Matter flag.

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 Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an international activist movement. This movement campaigns against violence and racism towards black people. In 2014, the American Dialect Society chose #BlackLivesMatter as their word of the year, and the Black Lives Matter campaign began spreading as a popular campaign.

Montpelier High School was the first of the Vermont high schools to raise the flag on Thursday, February 1, 2018, attracting national attention. Now the word is spreading and students at both Burlington and Montpelier HIgh School hope that other high schools will follow their lead.

According to the Burlington Free Press, many students at Burlington High School are hoping that this statement their high school is making by raising the flag, will help spur a national movement.

 

 

Opinion: Are Millennials Entitled or Driven?

Mr. Scott Stanley

F’ing millennials.

That seems to be the motto of our nation’s older generation. Millennials are viewed to be lazy, entitled, and narcissistic. People believe our nation’s youth are to blame for many of our nation’s problems, like the high unemployment rate, for example. That being said, so many studies on this seemingly ‘useless’ and ‘narcissistic’ generation highlight some of the benefits of our entitled generation, as well as the negatives. While a millennial’s sense of entitlement can make them act selfishly, it also allows them to be ambitious and tech-savvy.

A millennial’s sense of entitlement can cause them to act selfishly, leading to multiple behaviors. According to Forbes Magazine, millennials act selfishly by breaking the rules and demanding higher pay. These qualities in an employee can cause friction in the workplace. Millennial workers may develop poor relationships with their superiors as they believe they are above the system, thus not subject to its rules and guidelines.

Maybe we need to ask ourselves, is those who are in the system or the system itself that needs to change?

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With a millennial’s sense of entitlement comes an ambitious attitude towards their profession. According to Forbes magazine, “Entitled people feel a stronger drive for achievement; after all, if you feel like you deserve to be the top salesperson in your organization, you’re going to work harder to make that title a reality.” Entitlement works both ways. While it can seem to make millennials irritating and bothersome, it does give them the drive they need to progress in the workplace. Unlike previous generations, millennials don’t settle for where they are in their profession or life; they constantly work to improve themselves to be the best they can be.

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Environmentalism in the Kitchen: How a Plant-Based Diet Can Reduce Emissions… and be Delicious

Ms. Sarah Clauss, CVC Environmental Correspondent

When they think of emissions, most people think of cars and trucks and things that go. But our diet can have a huge effect on our carbon footprint. Livestock and their byproducts account for 51 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to the World Watch Institute. Essentially, the meat-lovers pizza you order might cost you more carbon than your ride home after.

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What can we do? I discussed environmental food choices with CVU student Ali Drew, who decided to cut all animal products out of her diet after watching a speech by vegan activist Gary Yourofsky. The main points addressed by Yourofsky included the environmental impacts and the ethics of consuming meat and other animal products. (His speech can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5hGQDLprA8&vl=en.) Drew says that it was difficult trying to replace foods, but she realized that it would be easier to find new vegan foods. A diet without animal products also reduces the amount of processed foods consumed, another benefit for environmentalists trying to change their habits. 

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Student-led Walkout Honors Parkland Victims, Advocates for Change

Mr. Scott A. Stanley

HINESBURG, VT — The recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida left the entire country in a state of shock and dismay. School shootings seem to have become more and more frequent since Columbine in 1999, and little has been done to prevent them. On the 14th of March, schools nationwide held walkouts to bring awareness to these atrocities and to push for change. The US Congress’ inability to institute new laws to protect school children have left many frustrated and demanding change. 

Because of a Nor’easter that shut down schools across Vermont, CVU Principal Adam Bunting moved the planned student action to Friday, March 16th. An estimated 600 students and faculty gathered at the entrance to the school.

While there were many people who both supported and opposed the walkout, Principal Adam Bunting decided to allow it. “We did it first obviously to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting, two, to encourage student advocacy, whether it’s one way or another.”

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Learn by Doing At Area Tech Centers

Ms. Makayla Driscoll

Champlain Valley Union High School hosted representatives from Burlington Technical Center and the Center for Technology, Essex on Thursday, February 8th to provide a brief overview of each program the schools offer. Both CTE and BTC provide technical programs based on challenging the comprehension of students 16 years and older, according to Vermont Adult Career and Technical Education Association.

Schools such as CVU, South Burlington High School, Colchester High School, and Essex High School allow students grades 10+ to apply for a program of their choice at either CTE or BTC to further their education in a specific field.  

According to Marie Eddy, one of CVU’s guidance counselor, CTE provides students with programs such as Automotive Technology, Building Technology and Systems, Childhood Education/ Human Services, Computer Animations & Web Design, Computer Systems Technology, Cosmetology, Dental Assisting, Design & Creative Media, Engineering & Architectural Design, Health Informatics, Natural Resources-Forestry and Mechanical, and Professional Foods.

Image courtesy of Big Heavy World

Image courtesy of Big Heavy World

 

Can’t find what you’re looking for at CTE? BTC provides Auto Body Repair, Automotive Science & Tech, Aviation & Aerospace Tech, Computer Systems & Emerging Technologies, Criminal Justice, Culinary Arts, Design & Illustration, Digital Media Lab, Human Services, Medical & Sports Sciences, Programming & Computer Science, and Welding/ Metal Fabrication programs. Between the two centers, everyone is bound to find a program that they’ll enjoy! 

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Scholars Bowl Teams Put a Serious (Intellectual) Smackdown on the Competition

Mr. Henry Caswell, CVC Campus Correspondent

When you think of Champlain Valley Union High School, what usually pops into your head is usually the athletics, the large student body, the strong community, and the wide variety of classes that our available to students. What you might not think of are the clubs, in particular the Scholars Bowl team.  Scholars Bowl is a competition involving questions and answer games where speedy answers are the key to winning.

This year’s team has been the most successful CVU Scholars Bowl team since 2011, according to John Bennett, the CVU Scholars Bowl coach. “We won the novice bracket at the PHAT tournament in December, the JV A and B state championships, the VT NAQT championship on March 9, and finished at least in the final 4 for the 9th time in the past 12 seasons.  Our quarterfinal win over Burlington is already being considered one of the most exciting matches ever. We beat all the other top contenders in the league this season at one time or another and played well in our semi-final loss to Hanover”, Bennet said.  

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Henry Wilson, Thomas Daley, Sam Gelin, Nate Hodgson-Walker, Cooper Birdsall, Zach Loiter, Mark Lang, Andrew Silverman, Mathew Silverman, Evan Beal, Bay Foley Cox, Peter Antinozzi, Milo Cress, Gabe Atkins, Ben Gramling, Isaac Krementsov, Sam Lawrence, Jake Tworog, and Patton Wager are all part of the team that is divided into smaller teams starting with the A team and ending at the F team.

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Snow Daze: Who Makes the Call and How?

Mr. Henry Caswell, CVC Special Ops

Every student at CVU will tell you that call at 6:00 in the morning noting that school has been cancelled is the best feeling ever. Living in Vermont, where snow is very prominent in the winter, students can expect around two or three snow days a year. But students usually never know if they’ll actually have a snow day until the next morning. Educating students and teachers on the factors that our administration takes consideration is important so we know the real chances of a snow day. In addition, it’s important to know who makes those decisions for Champlain Valley Union High School so we know who to hold accountable.

Jeanne Jensen, the COO of the Champlain Valley School District, talked about who makes the decisions around snow days and what factors they look when making the call. Jensen noted that it is the role of the superintendent to cancel school.

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Snow Day Calculator, Magic Eight Ball, or Jean Jensen? What do you rely on to plan your snow day?

When asked what factors are considered, Jensen said the following. “The factors that go into the decision are  the weather forecast from the National Weather Service, and the road conditions from the local town road commissioners – specifically whether or not they have been able (or think they will be able) to make the roads safe for travel.”

 Jensen also mentioned that it is easier to make a decision when the storm has ended overnight or is ending early in the morning. In addition, she said that it’s difficult to predict how the roads will be at 3:00 when we have to make a decision at 4:30 AM. “We never want to bring students to school and not be able to get them home,” Jensen added.

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Booth Shorn, New Boo Ban, and other Novelties at Winter Carnival ’18

This Year’s Winter Carnival Promotes New Changes

 HINESBURG, VT — The annual Winter Carnival that students look forward to was subject to some changes this year that received both positive and negative feedback.

 The Carnival involves many things such as a 3v3 basketball tournament, rail jam (if there’s snow), and many other festivities before the real competition begins. After wandering around the school and experiencing the various activities, students make their way towards the gymnasium for the main events: the trike race and class dances.

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 Before these spectacles occur, classes are separated and the usual rally chants begin to get the students fired up. One of these includes the classic, “We got spirit, yes we do. We got spirit, how ‘bout you?” Students in the chanting section will point towards another class and that class will repeat the chant.

 Normally, once this chant reached the freshman class, the freshmen would be booed regardless of their “spirit quality. This year upperclassmen did not boo the freshmen.

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 The booing was recently addressed as a hazing issue and many people believe that traditions should be changed in order to create a more welcoming environment for all students.

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